Spanish Proverbs

  • A Portuguese apprentice who can't sew, yet would be cutting out.
  • A bad compromise is better than a successful suit.
  • A bad day never hath a good night.
  • A bad excuse is better than none.
  • A bad labour, and a daughter after all.
  • A bad man's gift is like his master.
  • A bad mother wishes for good children.
  • A bad thing never dies.
  • A bad wound may be cured, bad repute kills.
  • A barking dog was never a good biter.
  • A bespattered hog tries to bespatter another.
  • A blind man's stroke, which raises a dust from beneath water.
  • A blind man's wife needs no paint.
  • A blow from a frying-pan, if it does not hurt, smuts.
  • A blow with a reed makes a noise but hurts not.
  • A boaster and a liar are cousins.
  • A boy's love is water in a sieve.
  • A buffeting threatened is never well given.
  • A bully is always a coward.
  • A buxom widow must be married, buried, or cloistered.
  • A child of a year old sucks milk from the heel.
  • A covetous abbot for one offering loses a hundred.
  • A cracked bell will never be sound.
  • A crazy vessel never falls from the hand.
  • A daily guest is a thief in the kitchen.
  • A determined heart will not be counselled.
  • A devotee's face, and a cat's claws.
  • A fast day is the eve of a feast day.
  • A father's love, for all other is air.
  • A fifth wheel to a cart is but an encumbrance.
  • A fool sometimes gives good counsel.
  • A fool, if he holds his tongue, passes for wise.
  • A fool, unless he know Latin, is never a great fool.
  • A fortress on its guard is not surprised.
  • A fortunate man may be anywhere.
  • A friend to everybody is a friend to nobody.
  • A full belly is neither good for flight, nor for fighting.
  • A girl draws more than a rope.
  • A good heart breaks bad fortune.
  • A good hope is better than a bad possession.
  • A good life defers wrinkles.
  • A good listener is a silent flatterer.
  • A good name covers theft.
  • A good paymaster is keeper of other men's purses.
  • A good paymaster needs no security.
  • A good thing lost is a good thing valued.
  • A good word extinguishes more than a pailful of water.
  • A grain does not fill a sieve, but it helps its fellow.
  • A grand eloquence, little conscience.
  • A great lance-thrust to a dead Moor.
  • A great leap gives a great shake.
  • A great man's entreaty is a command.
  • A great position entails great responsibility.
  • A hair casts its shadow on the ground.
  • A handful of motherwit is worth a bushel of learning.
  • A handsome man is not quite poor.
  • A handsome woman is either silly or vain.
  • A hangman is a good trade, he doth his work by daylight.
  • A house filled with guests is eaten up and ill spoken of.
  • A house ready built and a vineyard ready planted.
  • A hundred tailors, a hundred millers, and a hundred weavers, are three hundred thieves.
  • A hundred years hence we shall all be bald.
  • A hungry belly listens to no one.
  • A hungry man discovers more than a hundred lawyers.
  • A hungry man is an angry man.
  • A husband with one eye rather than with a son.
  • A kitchen-dog is never a good rabbit-hunter.
  • A lame goat will not sleep by day.
  • A lawsuit for a maravedi consumes a real's worth of paper.
  • A lazy ox is little the better for the goad.
  • A lazy youth, a lousy age.
  • A little gall embitters much honey.
  • A little loss frightens, a great one tames.
  • A man forewarned is as good as two.
  • A man gains nothing by vain glory but contempt and hatred.
  • A man may hap to bring home with him what makes him weep.
  • A man may lose his goods for want of demanding them.
  • A man that has had his fill is no eater.
  • A man that is lean, not from hunger, is harder than brass.
  • A man who prides himself on his ancestry is like the potato plant, the best part of which is underground.
  • A measly hog infects the whole sty.
  • A melon and a woman are hard to know.
  • A mewing cat is never a good mouser.
  • A monkey remains a monkey, though dressed in silk.
  • A morsel eaten selfishly does not gain a friend.
  • A mule and a woman do what is expected of them.
  • A mute bird makes no omen.
  • A north wind has no corn, and a poor man no friend.
  • A peasant between two lawyers is like a fish between two cats.
  • A peasant will stand on the top of a hill for a very long time with his mouth open before a roast duck will fly in.
  • A peck of March dust is worth a king's ransom.
  • A penny spared is a penny saved.
  • A pig bought on credit grunts all the year.
  • A pig bought on credit is forever grunting.
  • A pig's tail will never make a good arrow.
  • A poor man is all schemes.
  • A postern door makes a thief.
  • A proverb is a short sentence based on long experience.
  • A reconciled friend is a double enemy.
  • A rich man is either a scoundrel or the heir of a scoundrel.
  • A scabby colt may make a good horse.
  • A secret between two is God's secret, a secret between three is everybody's.
  • A shock dog is starved and nobody believes it.
  • A shoemaker's wife and a smith's mare are always the worst shod.
  • A short halter for a greedy horse.
  • A short horse is soon curried.
  • A sick man sleeps, but not a debtor.
  • A son-in-law's friendship is a winter's sun.
  • A sooty chimney costs many a beef-steak.
  • A sparrow in the hand is better than a bustard on the wing.
  • A spot shows most on the finest cloth.
  • A tree often transplanted neither grows nor thrives.
  • A true gentleman would rather have his clothes torn than mended.
  • A turn of the key is better than the conscience of a friar.
  • A turtle makes progress when it sticks its neck out.
  • A well-wisher sees from afar.
  • A wise man changes his mind, a fool never.
  • A woman's tears and a log's limping are not real.
  • A word and a stone once launched cannot be recalled.
  • A word from the mouth, a stone from a sling.
  • Abbot of Carcuela, you eat up the pot and ask for the pipkin.
  • About the King and the Inquisition, hush!
  • According to the custom of Aragon, good service, bad guerdon.
  • After a thrifty father, a prodigal son.
  • After breaking my head you bring plaister.
  • After one vice a greater follows.
  • After stuffing pears within, drink old wine until they swim.
  • After the house is finished, he deserts it.
  • After the vintage, baskets.
  • Alas! father, another daughter is born to you.
  • All do not beg for one saint.
  • All in the way of joke the wolf goes to the ass.
  • All is fair in love and war.
  • All is not lost that is in danger.
  • All things of this world are nothing, unless they have reference to the next.
  • All's fish that comes to the net.
  • All's for the best in the best of all possible worlds.
  • All's lost that's put in a riven dish.
  • All's not lost that's in danger.
  • Always taking out and never putting in, soon reaches the bottom.
  • An ass let him be who brays at an ass.
  • An ass with her colt goes not straight to the mill.
  • An inch in a sword, or a palm in a lance, is a great advantage.
  • An oak is not felled at one blow.
  • An oak is not felled at one stroke.
  • An open door tempts a saint.
  • An ounce of mother is worth a pound of priests.
  • An ounce of state to a pound of gold.
  • An ounce of wit that's bought Is worth a pound that's taught.
  • Another's care hangs by a hair.
  • Arms and money require good hands.
  • As are the times, so are the manners.
  • As for friars, live with them, eat with them, and walk with them; then sell them as they do themselves.
  • As is the king, so are his people.
  • As is the master, so is his dog.
  • As mony heads, as mony wits.
  • As the abbot sings the sacristan responds.
  • As the best wine makes the sharpest vinegar, so the deepest love turns to the deadliest hatred.
  • As the call, so the echo.
  • As the day lengthens, so the cold strengthens.
  • Ask not after a good man's pedigree.
  • Ask too much to get enough.
  • At an ambuscade of villains a man does better with his feet than his hands.
  • At an auction keep your mouth shut.
  • At the end the Gloria is chanted.
  • At the wedding-feast the least eater is the bride.
  • Attack is the best form of defence.
  • Attack is the best form of defense.
  • Avoid a friend who covers you with his wings and destroys you with his beak.
  • Away with thee, sickness, to where they make a good pillow for thee.
  • Bachelor, a peacock; betrothed, a lion; married, an ass.
  • Bad news is always true.
  • Bargains are dear.
  • Be a custom good or bad, a peasant will have it continue in force.
  • Be merry, Shrovetide, for to-morrow thou wilt be ashes.
  • Be my enemy and go to my mill.
  • Be not a baker if your head is butter.
  • Be not an esquire where you were a page.
  • Before the time, great courage; when at the point, great fear.
  • Before you marry, beware, for it is a knot difficult to untie.
  • Before you marry, have a house to live in, fields to till, and vines to cut.
  • Beggars must not be choosers.
  • Better be the head of a rat than the tail of a lion.
  • Better go about than be drowned.
  • Better go about than fall into the ditch.
  • Better is rule than rent.
  • Better is the smoke of my own house than the fire of another's.
  • Better joy in a cottage than sorrow in a palace.
  • Better lose a supper than have a hundred physicians.
  • Better one "Take this," than two "I will give you."
  • Better rule in hell, than serve in heaven.
  • Better sit idle than work for naught.
  • Better suffer a known evil than change for uncertain good.
  • Better there should be too much than too little.
  • Better they should say, "There he ran away," than "There he died."
  • Better to bend than break.
  • Between saying and doing there is a long road.
  • Between two friends a notary and two witnesses.
  • Between two sharpers, the sharpest.
  • Between two stools one falls to the ground.
  • Beware of a reconciled friend as of the devil.
  • Blessings on him that said, Face about.
  • Blood boils without fire.
  • Blow, smith, and you'll get money.
  • By the street of "By-and-By" one arrives at the house of "Never."
  • By the thread we unwind the skein.
  • Call me not fortunate till you see me buried.
  • Carry bread in your hood to Don Garcia's wedding.
  • Charity well regulated begins at home.
  • Chastise one that is worthless, and he will presently hate you.
  • Cheese from the ewe, milk from the goat, butter from the cow.
  • Choose neither a woman nor linen by candlelight.
  • Clay and lime conceal much evil.
  • Cleaning a blot with blotted fingers maketh a greater.
  • Cleanliness is next to godliness.
  • Clergymen's sons always turn out badly.
  • Colts by falling, and lads by losing, grow prudent.
  • Come fish, come frog, all goes into the basket.
  • Come live with me and you'll know me.
  • Comes in at the end with a wet sail.
  • Coming events cast their shadow before.
  • Command your wealth, else that will command you.
  • Compare your griefs with other men's and they will seem less.
  • Copper begets copper, and not ()the labour of) men's bones.
  • Corsair against corsair nothing is got but empty casks.
  • Covetousness bursts the bag.
  • Cow of many - well milked and badly fed.
  • Coward against coward, the assailant conquers.
  • Curses on accounts with relations.
  • Curses, like chickens, always come home to roost.
  • Curses, like chickens, come home to roost.
  • Custom becomes law.
  • Custom in infancy becomes nature in old age.
  • Custom makes all things easy.
  • Dance to the tune that is played.
  • Debts are like children; the smaller they are the more noise they make.
  • Deceive not thy physician, confessor, or lawyer.
  • Deeds are love, and not fine phrases.
  • Desire beautifies what is ugly.
  • Discover not your silent money (i.e. your hoarded money) to anybody.
  • Discreet stops make speedy journeys.
  • Do not buy a carrier's ass, or marry an innkeeper's daughter.
  • Do not fret for news, it will grow old and you will know it.
  • Do not lose honour through fear.
  • Do not rejoice at my grief, for when mine is old yours will be new.
  • Do not steal a loaf from him that kneads and bakes.
  • Do not stuff your servant with bread, and he won't ask for cheese.
  • Do not tell your secrets behind a wall or a hedge.
  • Do not throw a stone at the mouse and break the precious vase.
  • Do not throw pearls to swine.
  • Do what I say well, and not what I do ill.
  • Do what the friar says, and not what he does.
  • Do you carry the trough, husband, and I will carry the sieve, which is as heavy as the devil.
  • Do you want to buy cheap? Buy of a needy fool.
  • Do you want to see a wolf with young (i.e. an insatiable plunderer)? Marry your daughter.
  • Don't believe what you see, husband, but only what I tell you.
  • Don't bet more than you can afford to lose.
  • Don't bite off more than you can chew.
  • Don't kill the man at the count's desire.
  • Don't offer me advice; give me money.
  • Don't scuffle with the potter, for he makes money by the damage.
  • Don't send away your cat for being a thief.
  • Don't speak unless you can improve on the silence.
  • Don't spoil the ship for a halfpenny-worth of tar.
  • Don't stop the way of a bull or of a current of air.
  • Don't take any wooden nickles.
  • Drink wine upon figs.
  • Dung is no saint, but where it falls it works miracles.
  • Eating sets the head to rights.
  • Either rich or hanged.
  • Either the ass will die, or he that goads it.
  • Either you sink or you swim.
  • Enjoy your little while the fool seeks for more.
  • Entreaties to get him to sing, and entreaties to leave off.
  • Entreaty and right do the deed.
  • Even the best writer has to erase.
  • Every cock crows on his own dunghill.
  • Every cock is proud on his own dung hill.
  • Every country has its custom.
  • Every fool is pleased with his bauble.
  • Every law is broken to become a king.
  • Every man is a fool in some man's opinion.
  • Every man is the son of his own works.
  • Every man should support himself, and not hang upon another.
  • Every one feels the cold according as he is clad.
  • Every one in his own house, and God in all men's.
  • Every one is wise when the mischief is done.
  • Every one sneezes as God pleases.
  • Every one speaks of the fair as he himself finds it.
  • Every one wishes to bring water to his own mill, and leave his neighbour's dry.
  • Every potter praises his pot, especially if cracked.
  • Everybody's friends and nobody's friend is all one.
  • Everything in its season, and turnips in Advent.
  • Expect not at another's hand what you can do by your own.
  • Fall sick, and you will see who is your friend and who not.
  • Fancy surpasses beauty.
  • Fast as the hare runs, the greyhound outruns her, since he catches her.
  • Feet that are used to move cannot remain quiet.
  • Fire and love do not say "Go to your work."
  • Fire, fire, many pots on. and one pea in them all.
  • First cobwebs, then chains.
  • First come to the mill, first grind.
  • Flying from the bull he fell into the river.
  • Folly is the most incurable of maladies.
  • Folly is the product of all countries and ages.
  • Fond of lawsuits, little wealth, Fond of doctors, little health.
  • Fond of lawsuits, little wealth; fond of doctors, little health; fond of friars, little honour.
  • Fond pride of dress is sure a very curse; Ere fancy you consult, consult your purse.
  • Fools and bairns should never see half-done work.
  • Fools and obstinate men make rich lawyers.
  • Fools and the perverse fill the lawyers' purse.
  • For a good companion good company.
  • For all one's early rising, it dawns none the sooner.
  • For better for worse they have married me.
  • For evil tongues, scissors.
  • For the want of worthy men they made my father alcade.
  • For want of a nail the shoe is lost.
  • For whom does the blind man's wife adorn herself?
  • For whom sword and courage are not enough, corslet and lance will not be enough.
  • Fortune aids the bold.
  • Foster a raven and it will peck out your eyes.
  • Four things put a man beside himself - women, tobacco, cards, and wine.
  • Fox's broth, cold and scalding.
  • Fresh port and new wine, send a Christian to the churchyard. (Kill a man before his time.)
  • Friday pretexts for not fasting (meaning pleas of indisposition for not eating fish.)
  • Friendship broken may be soldered, but never made whole.
  • From a fallen tree, all make kindling.
  • From a praying young man, and a fasting old man, God preserve my cloak.
  • From a silent man, and a dog that does not bark, deliver us.
  • From a silent person remove your dwelling.
  • From long journeys long lies.
  • From my gossip's bread a large piece for my godson.
  • From smooth water God preserve me, from rough I will preserve myself.
  • From snow, whether baked or boiled, you will get nothing but water.
  • From that dust comes this mud.
  • Gifts break (or dissolve) rocks.
  • Give a clown your foot, and he'll take your hand.
  • Give a dog a bad name and hang him.
  • Give a traitor good words and you make him loyal.
  • Give me a seat, and I will make myself room to lie down.
  • Give me the ass that carries me in preference to the horse that throws me.
  • Give orders and do no more, and nothing will come of it.
  • Giving alms never lessens the purse.
  • Go in God's name, for he takes a loaf of mine.
  • Go not every evening to your brother's house.
  • Go not with every ailment to the doctor, with every plea to the lawyer, or with every thirst to the can.
  • Go to bed supperless and you will wake without debt.
  • Go to bed with the lamb, and rise with the lark.
  • Go to friends for advice; to women for pity; to strangers for charity; to relatives for nothing.
  • Go to your aunt's house, but not every day.
  • God cures, and the doctor takes the fee.
  • God defend you from the devil, the eye of a harlot, and the turn of a die.
  • God delays but doesn't forget.
  • God does not smite with both hands.
  • God gives almonds to one who has no teeth.
  • God gives wings to the ant that she may perish the sooner.
  • God grant me to argue with those who understand me.
  • God grant me to contend with those that understand me.
  • God grant you good fortune, my son, for knowledge avails you little.
  • God grant, dear wife, that this son be ours.
  • God helps the early riser.
  • God keep you from "It is too late."
  • God made us, and we admire ourselves.
  • God makes the back to the burden.
  • God take you, pound (of flax), drunk out and not yet spun.
  • God will listen to you whatever cloak you wear.
  • God will provide, but a good bundle of straw will not be amiss.
  • God writes straight with crooked lines.
  • God, healeth, and the physician hath the thanks.
  • Good is the fowl which another rears.
  • Good luck makes its way in by elbowing.
  • Good men must die, but death cannot kill their names.
  • Good wine needs no crier.
  • Good words and bad deeds deceive both wise and simple.
  • Good words and no deeds are rushes and reeds.
  • Good words fill not a sack.
  • Good, good, good, but God keep my ass out of his rye.
  • Good, that comes too late, is good as nothing.
  • Happy the house in which there is no shaven crown.
  • Have a bill to pay at Easter, and your Lent will be short.
  • He buys well who is not called a donkey.
  • He can do but little who cannot threaten another.
  • He cannot find water in the sea.
  • He did not invent gunpowder.
  • He does not a little who burns his house: he frightens the rats, and warms himself.
  • He expects to find water at the first stroke of the spade.
  • He falls into the pit who leads another into it.
  • He gathers up ashes and scatters flour.
  • He goes safely to trial whose father is a judge.
  • He has much to do who would please everybody.
  • He is a great simpleton who starves himself to feed another.
  • He is always right who suspects that he makes mistakes.
  • He is blind enough who cannot see through a sieve.
  • He is in safety who rings the tocsin.
  • He is out of danger who rings the alarm-bell.
  • He is your friend who gets you out of a fray.
  • He knows it as well as his Lord's Prayer.
  • He loses his market who has nothing to sell.
  • He that does not lie, does not come of good blood.
  • He that eats his fowl alone may saddle his horse alone.
  • He that eats the king's geese shall be choked with the feathers.
  • He that has a good harvest must be content with a few thistles.
  • He that has an hour's start will not be hanged.
  • He that has an ill name is half hanged.
  • He that has no ill luck grows weary of good luck.
  • He that is more civil than usual, either wants to cozen you or has need of you.
  • He that is not sensible of his loss has lost nothing.
  • He that makes one basket can make a hundred.
  • He that minds his business at home, will not be accused of taking part in the fray.
  • He that neglects time, time will neglect.
  • He that stirs honey will have some of it stick to him.
  • He that ties well, unties well.
  • He that trusts a faithless friend, has a good witness against him.
  • He that will not when he can, cannot when he will.
  • He that will not when he may, when he will he shall have nay.
  • He that would be healthy must wear his winter clothes in summer.
  • He that would be healthy, must eat temperately, and sup early.
  • He that would have a beautiful wife should choose her on a Saturday.
  • He to whom God gives no sons, the devil gives nephews.
  • He who always tells me a lie never cheats me.
  • He who asks the fewest favours is the best received.
  • He who at thirty has no brains, will never purchase an estate.
  • He who at twenty understands nothing, at thirty knows nothing, and at forty has nothing, will lead a wretched old age.
  • He who avoids the temptation avoids the sin.
  • He who begins badly, ends badly.
  • He who builds a house, or marries, is left with a lank purse.
  • He who buts a horse buys care.
  • He who buys and sells does not feel what he spends.
  • He who catches one fish is a fisherman.
  • He who comes first grinds first.
  • He who dances well goes from wedding to wedding.
  • He who delays, gathers.
  • He who denies everything confesses everything.
  • He who divides gets the worst share.
  • He who does good to you either dies or goes away.
  • He who does no more than another is no better than another.
  • He who does not honour his wife, dishonours himself.
  • He who does not look before lags behind.
  • He who does not mix with the crowd knows nothing.
  • He who does not pick up a pin cares nothing for his wife.
  • He who does not repair his gutter has a whole house to repair.
  • He who does not show himself, is overlooked.
  • He who does not speak, God does not hear.
  • He who does not tire, achieves.
  • He who does not whip the child does not mend the youth.
  • He who does what he likes, does not what he ought.
  • He who doubts nothing knows nothing.
  • He who dresses ion others' clothes will be undressed on the highway.
  • He who eats alone chokes alone.
  • He who eats and puts by, has sufficient for two meals.
  • He who eats the meat let him pick the bone.
  • He who finds fault wants to buy.
  • He who gives to the public, gives to no one.
  • He who gives when he is asked has waited too long.
  • He who goes far from home to marry, goes either to deceive or be deceived.
  • He who goes with wolves learns to howl.
  • He who grasps all loses all.
  • He who grasps at much holds fast little.
  • He who greases his cart-wheels helps his oxen.
  • He who greases his wheels, helps his oxen.
  • He who hangs out a branch wants to sell his wine.
  • He who has a bad wife can expect no happiness that can be so called.
  • He who has a good wife can bear any evil.
  • He who has a handsome wife, a castle on the frontier, or a vineyard on the roadside, is never without war.
  • He who has a son grown up should not call another a thief.
  • He who has a tongue goes to Rome.
  • He who has a trade may travel through the world.
  • He who has been first a novice and then an abbot, knows what the boys do behind the altar.
  • He who has been stung by the scorpion is frightened at its shadow.
  • He who has both money and bread, may choose with whom his daughter to wed.
  • He who has but one coat cannot lend it.
  • He who has daughters to marry, let him give them silk to spin.
  • He who has enemies, let him not sleep.
  • He who has got four and spends five, has no occasion for a purse.
  • He who has lost his oxen is always hearing bells.
  • He who has lost his reputation is a dead man among the living.
  • He who has no head wants no hat.
  • He who has no house of his own is everywhere at home.
  • He who has no voice in the valley, will have none in the council.
  • He who has no wife, is for thrashing her daily; but he that has one, takes care of her.
  • He who has servants has unavoidable enemies.
  • He who has sheep has fleeces.
  • He who has shipped the devil, must carry him over the sound.
  • He who has to deal with a blockhead has need of much brains.
  • He who has two masters to serve must lie to one of them.
  • He who helps everybody, helps nobody.
  • He who is everybody's friend is either very poor or very rich.
  • He who is feared gets more than his own.
  • He who is in the mud likes to get another into it.
  • He who is silent gains store.
  • He who keeps his own secret avoids much mischief.
  • He who knows little soon tells it.
  • He who laid a snare for me has fallen into it.
  • He who lives a long life must pass through much evil.
  • He who lives in hopes, breakfasts ill and sups worse.
  • He who looks demurely trust not with your money.
  • He who loves Bertrand loves his dog.
  • He who loves Peter won't harm his dog.
  • He who loves me loves my dog too.
  • He who loves well is slow to forget.
  • He who loves well, obeys well.
  • He who made fun of the old man, laughed at first and cried afterwards.
  • He who makes a law should keep it.
  • He who makes light of his enemy dies by his hand.
  • He who marries ill, is long in becoming widowed.
  • He who marrieth does well, but he who marrieth not, better.
  • He who measures oil greases his hands.
  • He who peeps through a hole will discover his dole.
  • He who pledges or promises runs in debt.
  • He who pours water hastily into a bottle spills more than goes in.
  • He who promises incurs a debt.
  • He who receives the offerings let him ring the bells.
  • He who reforms, God assists.
  • He who remains in the mill grinds, not he who goes to and fro.
  • He who rides behind another does not saddle when he will.
  • He who saves, finds.
  • He who says what he likes, hears what he don't like.
  • He who seeks, finds.
  • He who serves is not free.
  • He who serves many masters must neglect some of them.
  • He who sleeps much, learns little.
  • He who sows brambles must not go barefoot.
  • He who sows brambles reaps thorns.
  • He who sows courtesy reaps friendship, and he who plants kindness gathers love.
  • He who sows well, reaps well.
  • He who spits above himself will have it fall on his face.
  • He who steals once is never trusty.
  • He who strives to do, does more than he who has the power.
  • He who stumbles and does not fall mends his pace.
  • He who stumbles twice over one stone deserves to break his shins.
  • He who takes the wrong road must make his journey twice over.
  • He who talks much is sometimes right.
  • He who tells his own secret will hardly keep another's.
  • He who threatens to strike, and does not, is afraid.
  • He who trifles with his enemy dies by his hand.
  • He who wants a mule without fault must walk on foot.
  • He who wants to be rich in a year comes to the gallows in half a year.
  • He who wants to catch fish must not mind a wetting.
  • He who wants to kill his dog only has to say he is mad.
  • He who was first an acolyte, and afterwards an abbot or curate, knows what the boys do behind the altar.
  • He who works on the highway will have many advisers.
  • He who would cheat the fox must rise early.
  • He who would take must give.
  • He who would thrive must follow the church, the sea, or the king's service.
  • He whose house is tiled with glass should not throw stones at his neighbour's.
  • He will never worship well the image on the altar who knew it when it was a trunk of wood in the garden.
  • Health and cheerfulness make beauty; finery and cosmetics cost money and lie.
  • Hear first, and speak afterwards.
  • Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil.
  • Him who errs, forgive once, but never twice.
  • His bread fell into the honey.
  • His courage oozed out at his fingers' ends.
  • Honey was not made for the mouth of the ass.
  • How shall the enemy of the bride speak well of the wedding?
  • However bright the sun may shine, leave not you cloak at home.
  • However foul it be, never say, Of this water I will not drink.
  • Hunger and cold give a man up to his enemy.
  • Husband, don't see; wife, be blind.
  • Husband, you are a cuckold; wife, who told you so?
  • Hush, brideswoman, I knew all that before.
  • I a lazy lout, you a lazy lout, marry me, Antonia.
  • I am like you and you like me. the devil united us.
  • I am neither at the ford nor the bridge.
  • I broke my leg, perhaps for my good.
  • I dance to the tune that is played.
  • I do not tell thee what thou art, thou wilt tell it thyself.
  • I don't count them to you, wife, but a hog makes twelve puddings.
  • I don't want it, I don't want it, but put it into my hood.
  • I don't want the cheese; I just want out of the trap.
  • I have a good jacket in France.
  • I know well what I say when I ask for bread.
  • I know what I know, but will say nothing about it.
  • I left what I knew for what I heard praised, and repented.
  • I like not fair terms and a villain's mind.
  • I mistress and you miss, who is to sweep the house?
  • I neither give nor take, like a Jew on the Sabbath.
  • I never was satisfied with "I will, I will." One "take this" is better than two "I will give you."
  • I perfectly feel even at my fingers end.
  • I say it to you, daughter; hear it, daughter-in-law.
  • I stubborn and you stubborn, who is to carry the load?
  • I thought I had no husband, and I eat up the stew.
  • I thought to cross myself, and I put out my eye.
  • I'll marry, and eat the prime of the pot, and sit down first.
  • If I am a fool, put your finger in my mouth.
  • If I die, I forgive you; if I live, we shall see.
  • If folly were a pain, there would be groaning in every house.
  • If love be timid it is not true.
  • If lying were a capital crime, the hangman would work overtime.
  • If one, two, three say you are an ass, put on a tail.
  • If only I were a bird! Ah, but eating caterpillars?
  • If people lead, the leaders will follow.
  • If the child cries let the mother hush it, and if it will not be hushed let it cry.
  • If the eyes don't see, the heart won't break.
  • If the mountain will not go to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain.
  • If the pitcher knocks against a stone, woe to the pitcher; and if the stone knocks against the pitcher, woe to the pitcher.
  • If the rings are lost, here are the fingers still.
  • If the sky falls there will be pots broken.
  • If the sky falls we shall catch larks.
  • If the sky falls, hold up your hands.
  • If there be no remedy, why worry?
  • If there were no receiver there would be no thief.
  • If there were no receivers, there would be no thieves.
  • If they say you are good, ask you self if it be true.
  • If this ball does not stick to the wall it will at least leave a mark.
  • If three people say you are an ass, put on a bridle.
  • If thy heart fail thee, why then climb at all?
  • If you eat it up at supper, you cannot have it for breakfast.
  • If you have a friend who is a doctor, make your bow and send him to the house of your enemy.
  • If you have a loitering servant, set his dinner before him and send him on an errand.
  • If you listen at a hole, you will hear ill of yourself as well as others.
  • If you love me, John, your acts will tell me so.
  • If you pay what you owe, what you're worth you'll know.
  • If you play with fire you get burnt.
  • If you want to be dead, wash your head and go to bed.
  • If you want to be respected, you must respect yourself.
  • If you want to be revenged, hold your tongue.
  • If you want to beat a dog, say he eat your iron.
  • If you want to know secrets, seek for them in trouble or in pleasure.
  • If you want to know what a ducat is worth, try to borrow one.
  • If you want to know what a man is really like, notice how he acts when he loses money.
  • If you want to live and thrive, let the spider run alive.
  • If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans.
  • If you want to thrash your wife, ask her for a drink of water in the sun.
  • If you wish to be well served, serve yourself.
  • If you would acquire fame, let not the sun shine on you in bed.
  • If you would be pope, you must think of nothing else.
  • If you would be well served, serve yourself.
  • If you would live healthy, be old early.
  • If you would make a thief honest, trust him.
  • Ill luck enters by fathoms and departs by inches.
  • Ill-luck upon ill-luck, and a stone for a pillow.
  • In a smith's house the knife is wooden.
  • In a wood don't walk behind another.
  • In frosty weather a nail is worth a horse.
  • In hunting and in love you begin when you like and leave off when you can.
  • In less than a thousand years we shall all be bald.
  • In my own house I am a king.
  • In the bagpiper's house they are all dancers.
  • In the garden more grows, than the gardener sows.
  • In the report, of riches and goodness always bate one half.
  • In the rich woman's house she always commands; he never.
  • Ingratitude is the daughter of pride.
  • Invite your son-in-law to a fowl, and he will take away the lemon.
  • It fares ill with the house where the spinning-wheel commands the sword.
  • It goes ill in the house where the hen sings and the cock is silent.
  • It is a bad hen that eats at your house and lays at another's.
  • It is a loss of soap to wash the ass's head.
  • It is a wise son that knows his own father.
  • It is better to be a mouse in a cat's mouth than a man in a lawyer's hands.
  • It is better to leap over the ditch than trust to the pleadings of good men.
  • It is better to lose than lose more.
  • It is better to strive with a stubborn ass than to carry the wood on one's back.
  • It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.
  • It is better to weep with wise men than to laugh with fools.
  • It is courage that vanquishes in war, and not good weapons.
  • It is fair and just to cheat the cheater.
  • It is in putting it into the oven that the loaf is made crooked.
  • It is in vain to cast nets in a river where there are no fish.
  • It is not in the pilot's power to prevent the wind from blowing.
  • It is not necessary to fall into a well to know its depth.
  • It is not the fine, but the coarse and ill-spun that breaks.
  • It is not the hook or the rod, but the bait that lures.
  • It is not the load but the overload that kills.
  • It is not the same thing to talk of bulls as to be in the bullring.
  • It is nothing, they are only thrashing my husband.
  • It is the bait that lures, not the fisherman or the rod.
  • It is very savoury to eat scot free.
  • It little avails the unfortunate to be brave.
  • It will all come out in the soap-suds.
  • It's better to arrive on time than to be invited.
  • It's dogged as does it.
  • It's enough to make a parson swear, or a quaker kick his mother.
  • It's not the same to talk of bulls as to be in the bullring.
  • It's not worth crying over spilt milk.
  • Jest so that it may not turn to earnest.
  • Jesting costs money.
  • Justice, but not in my own house.
  • Kill and thou wilt be killed, and he will be killed who kills thee.
  • Know, cabbages, that there is spinach in the stew.
  • Large thongs of another man's leather.
  • Laws go the way kings direct.
  • Laws, like the spider's webs, catch the flies and let the hawk go free.
  • Leave the jest at its best.
  • Let every man mind his own business.
  • Let every sheep hang by it own foot.
  • Let every tub stand on its own bottom.
  • Let him not complain of being cheated who buys cloth by the pattern.
  • Let him play the instrument who knows how.
  • Let him that has a mouth not say to another, Blow.
  • Let him who does not know you buy you.
  • Let it be a husband, though it be but a log.
  • Let no one say, "Of this water I will not drink."
  • Let no one take a pawn that eats.
  • Let no shovel-beaked bird ever enter your yard.
  • Let the dog bark so he don't bite me.
  • Let the miracle be wrought, though it be by the devil.
  • Let the sun shine on me, for I care not for the moon.
  • Let them be birds. (Small eggs make little soup.)
  • Let them talk of men, and beg of me.
  • Let them whip me in the market-place, provided it be not known at home.
  • Let there be food in the pigeon-house, and the pigeons will come to it.
  • Let there be no lack of food in the pigeon-house, and the pigeons will come to it.
  • Let there be writing before you pay, and receipt before you write.
  • Let those pater nosters be for your own soul. (Ironical, against swearing.)
  • Let what is lost go for God's sake.
  • Like Banbury tinkers that in mending one hole make three.
  • Like a collier's sack, bad without and worse within.
  • Like a parakeet that says what he knows but doesn't know what he says.
  • Like blood, like good, and like age, make the happiest marriage.
  • Lip courtesy avails much and costs little.
  • Listeners hear no good of themselves.
  • Listeners never hear any good of themselves.
  • Little and often fills the purse.
  • Little beard, little modesty.
  • Little bird, little nest.
  • Little birds may pick a dead lion.
  • Little birds that can sing and won't sing must be made to sing.
  • Little by little one goes far.
  • Live with wolves, and you learn to howl.
  • Long life to the conqueror.
  • Lose no rights, and commit no extortions.
  • Losers are always in the wrong.
  • Love is like war, begin when you like and leave off when you can.
  • Love one that does not love you, answer one that does not call you, and you will run a fruitless race.
  • Love, grief, and money cannot be kept secret.
  • Lovers think that others have no eyes.
  • Luck comes to those who look after it.
  • Lying and gossiping go hand in hand.
  • Mad love - I for you, and you for another.
  • Make a bridge of silver for the flying enemy.
  • Make good flour, and do not blow the trumpet.
  • Make way for a madman and a bull.
  • Make your bargain before beginning to plow.
  • Man is fire, woman is tow; the devil comes with a bellows.
  • Manana is often the busiest day of the week.
  • Manual play, clown's play.
  • Many kiss hands they would fain see chopped off.
  • Mary Busybody never wants a bad day, and Mary Drone has God to give and bring to her.
  • May God not so prosper our friends that they forget us.
  • May the man be damned and never grow fat, Who wears two faces under one hat.
  • Michael is quits; he lost a ducat and gained a rabbit.
  • Miguel, Miguel, you have no bees, and yet sell honey.
  • Mildness governs more than anger.
  • Milk the cow that standeth still.
  • Money gets money.
  • Money soothes more than a gentleman's words.
  • Money turns bad into good.
  • Money will do more than my lord's letter.
  • Moses (i.e. a Jew) does not play because he has not the means.
  • Mother, marry me, marry me, or the gull will fly away with me.
  • Mother, what is marrying? Spinning, bearing children, and crying, daughter.
  • Much talking, much erring.
  • My daughter-in-law tucked up her sleeves, and upset the kettle into the fire.
  • My life and soul (are at your service), but not my pack-saddle.
  • My neighbour's goat gives more milk than mine.
  • My neighbour's hen lays more eggs than mine.
  • My sister's son is a kinsman beyond dispute.
  • My teeth are nearer than my kindred.
  • My teeth before my relations.
  • My word is my bond.
  • Nae man can baith sup an' blaw thegither.
  • Name not a rope in his house that hanged himself.
  • Needle and thread are half clothing.
  • Needs must when the devil drives.
  • Neither a good friar for friend, nor a bad one for enemy.
  • Neither handsome enough to kill, nor ugly enough to frighten.
  • Neither serve one who has been a servant, nor beg of one who has been a beggar.
  • Neither sign a paper without reading it, nor drink water without seeing it.
  • Never advise a man to go to the wars, or to marry.
  • Never advise anyone to go to war or to marry.
  • Never ask of him who has, but of him you know wishes you well.
  • Never ask pardon before you are accused.
  • Never put your thumbs between two grinders.
  • Never spread your corn to dry before the door of a saintly man.
  • New loves drive out the old.
  • New trappings to an old mule.
  • Night brings counsel.
  • No Jew a fool; no hare lazy.
  • No flies light on a boiling pot.
  • No fly gets into a shut mouth.
  • No joy without alloy.
  • No king was ever a traitor, or pope excommunicated.
  • No man is quick enough to enjoy life to the full.
  • No need to seek shelter for an old ox.
  • No one would be an innkeeper but for money.
  • No relation is poor.
  • No revenge is more honourable than the one not taken.
  • No rogue like the godly rogue.
  • No woman is ugly when she is dressed.
  • No wonder if he breaks his head who stumbles twice over one stone.
  • Nobody sows a thing that will not sell.
  • Not all things have to be scrutinized, nor all friends tested, not all enemies exposed and denounced.
  • Not he gives who likes, but who has.
  • Not the cry, but the flight of the wild duck, leads the flock to fly and follow.
  • Not to wish to recover is a mortal symptom.
  • Nothing is lost on a journey by stopping to pray or to feed your horse.
  • Now that I have an ewe and a lamb, every one says to me: Good morrow, Peter.
  • Nurse, you are mistress whilst the child sucks, and after that nothing.
  • Of brothers-in-law and red dogs few are good.
  • Of evils, the least.
  • Of other men's leather large thongs.
  • Of soups and loves the first are the best.
  • Of the malady a man fears, he dies.
  • Of your wife and your tried friend believe nothing but what you know for certain.
  • Old as is the boat it may cross the ferry once.
  • On a hot day muffle yourself more.
  • On a long journey even a straw weighs heavy.
  • On dry land even brackish water is good.
  • One ass among many monkeys is grinned at by all.
  • One bee is better than a thousand flies.
  • One cannot blow and swallow at the same time.
  • One drink is just right; two is too many; three are too few.
  • One eye on the frying-pan and the other on the cat.
  • One falsehood leads to another.
  • One grievance borne, another follows.
  • One knavery is met by another.
  • One love drives out another.
  • One man beats the bush, another catcheth the bird.
  • One starts the game and another bags it.
  • One stroke on the nail and a hundred on the horseshoe.
  • One trick is met by another.
  • One volunteer is worth two pressed men.
  • One wedding brings another.
  • One wolf does not bite another.
  • One's prog does not clog.
  • Order and do it, and you will be rid of anxiety.
  • Other folks' cares kill the ass.
  • Paper and ink and little justice.
  • Pay what you owe, and be cured of your complaint.
  • Peace and patience, and death with penitence.
  • Peralvillo justice: hang a man first and try him afterwards.
  • Peter is so godly that God does not improve his condition.
  • Peter pinches me, and I like it.
  • Play with an ass and he will flirt his tail in your face.
  • Play with the fool at home, and he will play with you abroad.
  • Play's gude, while it is play.
  • Please the eye, and pick the purse.
  • Please your eye and plague your heart.
  • Plough deep and you will have plenty of corn.
  • Plough deep whilst sluggards sleep, And you shall have corn to sell and to keep.
  • Plough or not plough, you must pay your rent.
  • Plough wet or dry, and you will not have to kiss your neighbour's breech.
  • Pluck it from among the thistles, and we will take it off your hands.
  • Possession and good right, with lance in hand.
  • Pound the garlic, Pedro, whilst I grate the cheese.
  • Pour not water on a drowned mouse.
  • Poverty does not destroy virtue, nor does wealth bestow it.
  • Poverty is no sin, but it is a branch of roguery.
  • Poverty is no sin.
  • Poverty is not a crime.
  • Praise yourself, basket, for I want to sell you.
  • Pray to God, but hammer away.
  • Prison and Lent were made for the poor.
  • Procrastination is the thief of time.
  • Prosperity forgets father and mother.
  • Put a beggar into your barn and he will make himself your heir.
  • Rather mulberry than almond. (The almond-tree is in blossom earlier than the mulberry.)
  • Rats do not play tricks with kittens.
  • Renounce the devil, and thou shalt wear a shabby coat.
  • Right or wrong, 'tis our house up to the roof.
  • Right or wrong, God aid our purpose.
  • Right overstrained turns to wrong.
  • Rise early and watch, labour and catch.
  • Said the frying pay to the kettle, Stand off, black bottom.
  • Salt split is never all gathered.
  • Say before they say.
  • Seat yourself in your place and you will not be made to quit it.
  • See how he has risen from a mayor to a hangman.
  • See that you tie so that you can untie.
  • See, hear, and hold your tongue.
  • Sell publicly and buy privately.
  • Sense comes with age.
  • Serve a lord and you'll know what is grief.
  • Set a peasant on horseback, and he forgets both God and man.
  • Set a sprat to catch a mackerel.
  • Seven brothers in a council make wrong right.
  • Seven is company, and nine confusion. (Alluding to a dinner party.)
  • She is fond of greens who kisses the gardener.
  • She is good and honoured who is dead and buried.
  • She is good who is close to the fire and does not burn.
  • She is nether fish nor fowl.
  • She who loves an ugly man thinks him handsome.
  • Shoemakers go to mass and pray that sheep may die.
  • Shoot at a pigeon and kill a crow.
  • Short hose must have long points.
  • Shut your door, and you will make your neighbour a good woman.
  • Silence and look out, we shall catch both hen and chicks.
  • Silent water is dangerous water.
  • Silly sheep, where one goes, all go.
  • Since I wronged you, I have never liked you.
  • Since we cannot get what we like, let us like what we can get.
  • Since we have loaves let us not look for cakes.
  • Since you have scolding me, I have counted a hundred and twenty holes in that nutmeg grater.
  • Skilled hands eat trouts.
  • Sleep is the best cure for waking troubles.
  • Sleep over it, and you will come to a resolution.
  • Smoke, a dripping roof, and a scolding wife, are enough to drive a man out of his life.
  • So money gets money.
  • So wise, so young, they say, do ne'er live long.
  • So you tell me there are wolves on the mountain, and foxes in the valley.
  • So yourself be good, a fig for your grandfather.
  • Soft and fair goes far.
  • Some day Peter will command as much as his master.
  • Some go to law, for the wagging of a straw.
  • Some have the fame, and other card the wool.
  • Sour wine, old bacon, and rye bread keep a house rich.
  • Sow corn in clay, and plant vines in sand.
  • Sow dry and set wet.
  • Sow much, reap much; sow little, reap little.
  • Stealing would be a nice thing, if thieves were hanged by the girdle.
  • Steel whets steel.
  • Such awkward things will happen as going into the great square and coming back without ears.
  • Sugared words generally prove bitter.
  • Take away the motive, and the sin is taken away.
  • Take hold lightly; let go lightly. This is one of the great secrets of felicity in love.
  • Take hold of a good minute.
  • Take in laundry before you take in partners.
  • Take the middle of the way and thou wilt not fall.
  • Take the will for the deed.
  • Take what you want, then pay for it.
  • Taking out and not putting in soon reaches the bottom.
  • Talk as you go, husband, to the gallows.
  • Talk little and well, and you will be looked upon as somebody.
  • Talk much, and err much.
  • Talk of sporting, and buy game in the market.
  • Talking is easy, action difficult.
  • Tell a lie, and you will bring out the truth.
  • Tell her she is handsome, and you will turn her head.
  • Tell it her once, and the devil will tell it her ten times.
  • Tell it well, or say nothing.
  • Tell me who you live with, and I will tell you who you are.
  • Tell not all you know, nor judge of all you see, if you would live in peace.
  • Tell your affairs in the market-place, and one will call them black and another white.
  • Tell your friend a lie; and if he keeps it secret, tell him the truth.
  • Tell your own story first.
  • That which covers thee discovers thee.
  • That which is cheap is dear.
  • The Jew ruins himself with passovers, the Moor with wedding feasts, and the Christian with lawsuits.
  • The Mother of God appears to fools.
  • The absent were never in the right.
  • The account is correct, but not a sixpense appears.
  • The act of treachery is liked, but not he that does it.
  • The ant gets wings that she may perish sooner.
  • The ass dead, the barley at his tail.
  • The ass knows well in whose face be brays.
  • The ass of many owners is food for wolves.
  • The bacon of paradise for the married man that does not repent.
  • The bad barber leaves neither hair nor skin.
  • The bad man always suspects knavery.
  • The bath has sworn not to whiten the blackamoor.
  • The beast that goes well is never without some one to try his paces.
  • The beginning of health is to know the disease.
  • The best cast at dice is not to play.
  • The best cloth has uneven threads.
  • The best cook drops a whole tomato.
  • The best feed of a horse is his master's eye.
  • The bow that is always bent slackens or breaks.
  • The bowels support the heart, and not the heart the bowels.
  • The boy is father to the man.
  • The brain, that sows not corn, plants thistles.
  • The busy fly is in every man's dish.
  • The busy man is troubled with but one devil, the idle man by a thousand.
  • The buyer has need of a hundred eyes. the seller but one.
  • The cask full, the mother-in-law drunk.
  • The cask smells of the wine it contains.
  • The cat always leaves her mark upon her friend.
  • The cat is friendly, but scratches.
  • The church, the sea, or the royal household, for whoever would thrive.
  • The cross on his breast, and the devil in his acts.
  • The cross on his breast, and the devil in his heart.
  • The day I did not make my toilette, there came to my house one I did not expect.
  • The day I did not sweep the house, there came to it one I did not expect.
  • The day you marry 'tis either kill or cure.
  • The dearest child of all is the dead one.
  • The deceived sheep that went for wool and came back shorn.
  • The devil gets into the belfry by the vicar's skirts.
  • The devil is so fond of his son that he put out his eye.
  • The dog that has its bitch in town never barks well.
  • The dress does not make the friar.
  • The drowning man is not troubled by rain.
  • The drunkard and the glutton come to poverty, and drowsiness clothes a man with rags.
  • The earth hides as it takes, the physician's mistakes.
  • The envious man's face grows sharp and his eyes big.
  • The epicure puts his purse into his belly.
  • The evil which issues from thy mouth falls into thy bosom.
  • The evil wound is cured, but not the evil name.
  • The exception proves the rule.
  • The exception which proves the rule.
  • The father of a saint, the son of a sinner.
  • The fault is as great as he that commits it.
  • The fertile field becomes sterile without rest.
  • The fierce ox becomes tame on strange ground.
  • The fire well knows whose cloak burns.
  • The first drink with water, the second without water, the third like water.
  • The first duty of a soldier is obedience.
  • The first faults are theirs that commit them, the second theirs that permit them.
  • The first wife is a broom, and the second a lady.
  • The fist loss is the best.
  • The fox does not do as much mischief in a year as it pays for in an hour.
  • The fox is knowing, but more knowing he who catches him.
  • The fox knows well with whom he plays tricks.
  • The fox that tarries long is on the watch for prey.
  • The friar who begs for God begs for two.
  • The full-fed cow makes company of her tail.
  • The gallows takes its own.
  • The gardener's dog, neither full nor hungry.
  • The gardener's feet do no harm to the garden.
  • The gentle lamb sucks any ewe as well as its mother; the surly lamb sucks neither its own nor another.
  • The girl as she is taught, the flax as it is wrought.
  • The glass-dealer's horses fell out, and he looked on to see which kicked hardest.
  • The goat can't well cover herself with her tail.
  • The golden ass passes everywhere.
  • The gossips fall out and tell each other truths.
  • The green burns for the dry, and the righteous pay for sinners.
  • The grey mare is the better horse.
  • The gutter by dropping wears the stone.
  • The heart is no traitor.
  • The hen lays upon an egg.
  • The honest man enjoys the theft.
  • The horse thinks one thing, and his rider another.
  • The horseshoe that clatters wants a nail.
  • The hunchback does not see his own hump, but sees his companion's.
  • The keys at the girdle, the dog in the larder.
  • The king goes as far as he can, not so far as he would.
  • The king likes the treachery, but not the traitor.
  • The kite's malady, its wings broken and its beak sound.
  • The land a man knows is his mother.
  • The lazy servant to save one step takes eight.
  • The leader follows in front.
  • The lean dog is all fleas.
  • The letter enters with blood.
  • The liar is sooner caught than the cripple.
  • The lion is not so fierce as he is painted.
  • The lion's not half so fierce as he's painted.
  • The loyal man lives no longer than the traitor pleases.
  • The magistrate's son gets out of every scrape.
  • The mare's kicks are caresses to the horse.
  • The master's foot is manure for the estate.
  • The mill gains by gong, and not by standing still.
  • The month loses its own, but not the year.
  • The more a woman admires her face, the more she ruins her house.
  • The more one has the more one wants.
  • The more riches a fool hath, the greater fool he is.
  • The more you court a clown the statelier he grows.
  • The more you get the more you want.
  • The most cautious passes for the most chaste.
  • The mother of mischief is no bigger than a midge's wing.
  • The mother reckons well, but the child reckons better.
  • The mother who spoils her child, fattens a serpent.
  • The mother-in-law must be entreated, and the pot must be let stand.
  • The mountain labored and brought forth a mouse.
  • The mouse that knows but one hole is soon caught by the cat.
  • The mouse that only trusts to one poor hole, Can never be a mouse of any soul.
  • The mouth and the purse, shut.
  • The mouth that says yes says no.
  • The oaths of one who loves a woman are not to be believed.
  • The obscure we see eventually. The completely apparent takes longer.
  • The official who can't lie may as well be out of the world.
  • The old for want of ability, and the young for want of knowledge, let things be lost.
  • The old man at home, and the young abroad, lie after the same fashion.
  • The old wife, if she does not serve for a pot, serves for a cover.
  • The one-eyed man is a king in the country of the blind.
  • The ox comes to the yoke at the call of his feeder.
  • The ox spoke and said "Moo."
  • The ox that butted me tossed me into a good place.
  • The ox without a bell is soon lost.
  • The paunch warm, the foot sleepy.
  • The pitcher goes so often to the well, that it leaves its handle or its mouth.
  • The poor man has his crop destroyed by hail every year.
  • The poor-houses are filled with the honestest people.
  • The rat that has but one hole is soon caught.
  • The rat that knows but one hole is soon caught by the cat.
  • The rich man transgresses the law, and the poor man is punished.
  • The righteous man sins before an open chest.
  • The scalded cat dreads cold water.
  • The secret in swimming is to know how to take care of your clothes.
  • The secret of patience is doing something else in the meantime.
  • The servant wench that has a mother in town swoons seven times a day.
  • The sharper soon cheats the covetous man.
  • The sharper the storm, the sooner it's over.
  • The shirt is nearer than the frock.
  • The smith's dog sleeps at the noise of the hammer, and wakes at the grinding of teeth.
  • The snail, to be rid of annoyances, bartered its eyes for horns.
  • The son of an ass brays twice a day.
  • The spider's web lets the rat escape and catches the fly.
  • The spot will come out in the washing.
  • The squeaking wheel gets the grease.
  • The stew mixed by many is ill-seasoned and worse cooked.
  • The stew that boils much loses flavour.
  • The stone is hard and the drop is small, but a hole is made by the constant fall.
  • The thorn comes into the world point foremost.
  • The thread breaks where it is thinnest.
  • The threatener loses the opportunity of vengeance.
  • The threshold says nothing but what it hears of the hinge.
  • The tide will fetch away what the ebb brings.
  • The tiger that has once tasted blood is never sated with the taste of it.
  • The tired ox plants his foot firmly.
  • The tongue of a bad friend cuts more than a knife.
  • The voice of the people is the voice of God.
  • The wages of sin is death.
  • The wedding feast is not made with mushrooms only.
  • The well-bred hound, if he does not hunt to-day will hunt to-morrow.
  • The well-dressed woman draws her husband away from another woman's door.
  • The well-fed sheep makes a cloak of its tail.
  • The winter is gone, the spring is come, a fly for those who us good have done.
  • The wise hand does not all that the tongue says.
  • The wise knows that he does not know; the ignoramus thinks he knows.
  • The wise man does not hang his knowledge on a hook.
  • The wolf and the fox are both in one story.
  • The wolf changes his teeth but not his disposition.
  • The wolf commits no mischief at home.
  • The wolf does that in the course of the week which hinders him from going to mass on Sunday.
  • The wolf picks up the ass's fleas by moonlight.
  • The woman in finery, the house in filth, but the doorway swept.
  • The worst ewe dungs in the milking-pail.
  • The worst of a lawsuit is that out of one there grow a hundred.
  • The worst pig gets the best acorn.
  • The wrong doer is never without a pretext.
  • There are all honest men, but my cloak is not to be found.
  • There are eyes that fall in love with bleared ones.
  • There are more threatened than hurt.
  • There is little use in watching a bad woman.
  • There is luck in leisure.
  • There is luck in odd numbers.
  • There is measure in all things.
  • There is mony a true tale tauld in jest.
  • There is never a great dunghill at a sportsman's door.
  • There is no answer for God out of my house, and What have you to do with my wife?
  • There is no beast so savage but sports with its mate.
  • There is no better patch than one off the same cloth.
  • There is no choicer morsel than that which is stolen.
  • There is no disinterested gift.
  • There is no house without its hush! hush!
  • There is no lock, if the pick is of gold.
  • There is no mother like the mother that bore us.
  • There is no pleasure but palls, and the more so if it costs nothing.
  • There is no pot so ugly but finds its cover.
  • There is no such witness as a good measure of wine.
  • There is no tax upon lying.
  • There is no thief without a receiver.
  • There is no worse apprentice than the one who doesn't want to know.
  • There is not a pair of ears for every Jew.
  • There is some distance between Peter and Peter.
  • There is truth in wine.
  • There would be no ill word if it were not ill taken.
  • There's no argument like that of the stick.
  • There's no making a good cloak of bad cloth.
  • They may whip me in the market-place, so it be not known at home.
  • They took away the mirror from me because I was ugly, and gave it to the blind woman.
  • They turn night into day.
  • They two agreed like two cats in a gutter.
  • They whip the cat, if our mistress does not spin.
  • They who don't keep goats and yet sell kids, where do they get them?
  • They who don't kill pigs must not expect black-puddings.
  • This is the milkmaid's tale.
  • Though my father-in-law is a good man, I do not like a dog with a bell.
  • Though the speaker be a fool, let the hearer be wise.
  • Though the sun shines, leave not your cloak at home.
  • Though you are a prudent old man, do not despise counsel.
  • Though you see me with this coat, I have another up the mountain.
  • Though your bloodhound be gentle, don't bite him on the lip.
  • Threatened men eat bread.
  • Threatened men live long.
  • Three Spaniards, four opinions.
  • Three daughters and their mother, four devils for the father.
  • Three men helping one another will do as much as six men singly.
  • Three strikes and you are out.
  • Three things are not to be trusted; a cow's horn, a dog's tooth, and a horse's hoof.
  • Three things kill a man: a scorching son, suppers, and cares.
  • Three things must epigrams, like bees, have all, A sting, and honey, and a body small.
  • Three who held each other are as good as six.
  • Through not spending enough we spend too much.
  • To a depraved taste sweet is bitter.
  • To a hard knot a hard wedge.
  • To a hasty demand a leisure reply.
  • To a son-in-law and a hog you need show the way but once.
  • To a woman and a magpie tell your secrets in the marketplace.
  • To be a merchant, the art consists more in getting paid than in making sales.
  • To be like the esquire of Guadalaxara, who knew nothing in the morning of what he said at night.
  • To be like the tailor of Campillo, who worked for nothing, and found thread.
  • To beards with money cavaliers pay respect.
  • To change one's mind is rather a sign of prudence than ignorance.
  • To eat and to scratch one has but to begin.
  • To err is human, to forgive divine.
  • To every evil doer his evil day.
  • To find oneself in tight breeches. (Ill at ease - we say in tight boots.)
  • To flee and to run are not all one.
  • To forget a wrong is the best revenge.
  • To give is honour, to love is grief.
  • To him that watches, everything is revealed.
  • To him who gives you a capon you may spare a leg and a wing.
  • To love and be wise is impossible.
  • To mad words deaf ears.
  • To own is to fear. [Sp., Tener es temer.]
  • To swim and swim more, and be drowned on shore.
  • To take ambition from a soldier, is to rob him of his spurs.
  • To the bold man fortune gives her hand.
  • To the good listener, half a word is enough.
  • To the grateful man give more than he asks.
  • To your son give a good name and a trade.
  • To-morrow will be another day.
  • To-morrow's remedy will not ward off the evil of to-day.
  • Today is yesterday's pupil.
  • Tomorrow is often the busiest day of the week.
  • Tomorrow is the busiest day of the year.
  • Too much breaks the bag.
  • Tripe broth, you make much of yourself.
  • Trouts are not caught with dry breeches.
  • True love suffers no concealment.
  • Trust in God upon good security.
  • Trust not your gossip to a priest who has been a friar.
  • Trust not your money to one whose eyes are bent on the ground.
  • Truth, like oil, always comes to the surface.
  • Truths and roses have thorns about them.
  • Two birds of prey do not keep each other company.
  • Two blacks don't make a white.
  • Two boys are half a boy, and three boys are no boy at all.
  • Two can play at that game.
  • Two cannot fall out if one does not choose.
  • Two false men to one traitor.
  • Two great talkers will not travel far together.
  • Two of a trade can never agree.
  • Two of a trade never agree.
  • Two sparrows on one ear of corn never agree.
  • Under a bad cloak there is a good tippler.
  • Under a gold sheath a leaden knife.
  • Under a good cloak may be a bad man.
  • Under a tattered cloak you will generally find a good drinker.
  • Under my cloak I command the king.
  • Under my cloak I kill the king.
  • Under the sackcloth there is something hid.
  • Vainglory blossoms, and bears no fruit.
  • Visit your aunt, but not every day of the year.
  • Walk till the blood appears on the cheek, but not the sweat on the brow.
  • Walk until the blood appears on the cheek, but not the sweat on the brow.
  • War with all the world, and peace with England.
  • Water for oxen, wine for kings.
  • We are as the king, only not as rich.
  • We are both carriers, and shall meet on the road.
  • We are not roasting, and already we are basting.
  • We are not yet roasting, and already we make sops in the pan.
  • We do not know what is good until we have lost it.
  • We have no son, and yet are giving him a name.
  • We have not yet saddled, and are already mounted.
  • Weight and measure save a man toil.
  • Welcome, misfortune, if you come alone.
  • Were you at the wedding, Molly? No, mother, but the bride was very fine.
  • What Christ does not take the exchequer takes.
  • What I see with my eyes I can guess with my fingers.
  • What children hear their parents say by the fireside they repeat in the highway.
  • What cures Sancho makes Martha sick.
  • What does not happen in a year may happen in a moment.
  • What force cannot do ingenuity may.
  • What is another's always pines for its master.
  • What is done, is done for this time.
  • What is in use, wants no excuse.
  • What is mine is my own; my brother Juan's is his and mine.
  • What is much desired is not believed when it comes.
  • What is new cannot be true.
  • What is whispered in your ear tell not to your husband.
  • What much is worth comes from the earth.
  • What must be, must be.
  • What my neighbour eats does my stomach no good.
  • What one does, one becomes.
  • What the abbot of Bamba cannot eat he gives away for the good of his soul.
  • What three know, everybody knows.
  • What you dislike for yourself do not like for me.
  • What's everybody's business is nobody's business.
  • Whatever way you take there is a league of bad road.
  • When God gives light he gives it for all.
  • When God pleases, it rains in fair weather.
  • When I was born I wept, and every day brings a reason why.
  • When a fool has made up his mind the market has gone by.
  • When a fox is in his hole, the smoke fetches him out.
  • When a good offer comes for your daughter, don't wait till her father returns from market.
  • When a goose dances, and a fool versifies, there is sport.
  • When a man is not used to breeches the seams gall him.
  • When a peasant gets rich, he knows neither relations nor friends.
  • When an old man cannot drink, prepare his grave.
  • When drink enters, wisdom departs.
  • When every one says you are an ass, bray.
  • When fire and water are at war, it is the fire that loses.
  • When flatterers meet the devil goes to dinner.
  • When he was born, Solomon passed by his door, and could not go in.
  • When ill-luck sleeps, let no one wake her.
  • When it rains in August, it rains honey and wine.
  • When it rains in February, it will be temperate all the year.
  • When love is not madness, it is not love. [Sp., Cuando amor no es locura, no es amor.]
  • When misfortune sleeps, let no one wake her.
  • When one door shuts, a hundred open.
  • When one door shuts, another opens.
  • When one wolf eats another, thee is nothing to eat in the wood.
  • When our daughter is married sons-in-law are plenty.
  • When our enemy flies, build him a golden bridge.
  • When passion entereth at the fore-gate wisdom goes out at the postern.
  • When poor, liberal; when rich, stingy.
  • When the Devil was sick the Devil a monk would be, When the Devil got well, the devil a monk was he.
  • When the Spaniard sings, he is either mad or has no money.
  • When the bee sucks, it makes honey, when the spider, poison.
  • When the cat's away the rats will play.
  • When the child cuts its teeth, death is on the watch.
  • When the corsair promises masses and candles, it goes ill with the galley.
  • When the devil says his prayers he wants to cheat you.
  • When the fields yield not, the saints have not.
  • When the flatterer pipes, the devil dances.
  • When the fool has made up his mind the market is over.
  • When the iron is hot, then is the time to strike.
  • When the prior plays cards, what will the monks do?
  • When the rabbit has escaped, comes advice.
  • When the river makes no noise, it is either dried up or much swollen.
  • When the spleen increases, the body diminishes.
  • When the steed is stolen, you shut the stable door.
  • When the summer is winter, and the winter is summer, it is a sorry year.
  • When there are two friends to one purse, one sings, the other weeps.
  • When they give you the calf, be ready with the halter.
  • When they offer you a ring, hold out your finger.
  • When thieves fall out the thefts come to light.
  • When thieves fall out, honest men come by their own.
  • When thou seest thy house in flames, go warm thyself by it.
  • When we ask a favour, we say, Madam; when we obtain it, what we please.
  • When we think to catch we are sometimes caught.
  • When you are an anvil, bear; when you are a hammer, strike.
  • When you are at Rome do as Rome does.
  • When you are on the road speak not ill of your enemy.
  • When you can't get bread, oat-cakes are not amiss.
  • When you can't get meat, chickens and bacon are good.
  • When you die, your trumpeter will be buried.
  • When you eat new bread, don't drink water.
  • When you go to a strange house knock at the door.
  • Where God has his church the Devil will have his chapel.
  • Where God sends babbies he sends penny loaves.
  • Where MacGregor sits at the head of the table.
  • Where force prevails, right perishes.
  • Where friars abound keep your eyes open.
  • Where luck is wanting, diligence is useless.
  • Where man is not, nature is barren.
  • Where one door is shut another opens.
  • Where one door shuts another opens.
  • Where shall the ox go and not plough?
  • Where the goat leaps, leaps that which sucks her.
  • Where the heart is past hope, the face is past shame.
  • Where the sea goes let the sands go.
  • Where there is love, there is pain.
  • Where there is no want of will, there will be no want of opportunity.
  • Where there's fire there's smoke.
  • Where they eat your meat let them pick the bones.
  • Where you lost your cloak, seek it.
  • Where you smart there I will hit you.
  • Where you think there is bacon, there are not even hooks for it.
  • Wherever you are, do as you see done.
  • Wherever you may be, do as you see done.
  • Wherries must not put out to sea.
  • Whether the pitcher strike the stone, or the stone the pitcher, woe be to the pitcher.
  • Whether you boil snow or pound it you can have but water of it.
  • Whether you ignore a pig, or worship that pig from afar, to the pig it's all the same.
  • Whilst the nurse suckles, we love her; when she is of no further use, she is forgotten.
  • White hands are no offence.
  • Whither goest thou, sorrow? Whither I am used to go.
  • Whither shall the ox go, where he will not have to plough?
  • Who arrays himself in other men's garments is stripped on the highway.
  • Who gives what he has before he is dead, take a mallet and knock that fool on the head.
  • Who has no bread to spare should not keep a dog.
  • Who has time yet waits for time, comes to a time of repentance.
  • Who is always prying into other men's affairs, leads a dangerous life.
  • Who is to bell the cat?
  • Who is to carry the cat to the water?
  • Who is well seated, let him not budge.
  • Who is your enemy? A man of your own trade.
  • Who lends recovers not; or if he recovers, recovers not all; or if not all, not much; of if much, a mortal enemy.
  • Who talks much, errs much.
  • Who ventures nothing has no luck.
  • Who wings, drives away care.
  • Whoever falls sick of folly, is long in getting cured.
  • Whoever gossips to you will gossip about you.
  • Whom God loves, his bitch litters pigs.
  • Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth.
  • Whom the gods love die young.
  • Whom the gods would destroy, they first make mad.
  • Whoredom and thieving are never long concealed.
  • Win a game of your friend, and drink the money on the spot.
  • Wind and good luck are seldom lasting.
  • Wipe your eye with your elbow.
  • Wit without discretion is a sword in the hand of a fool.
  • Wit's never bought till it's paid for.
  • With a little wrong a man comes by his right.
  • With a staircase before you, you look for a rope to go down by.
  • With bread and wine you can walk your road.
  • With lightning and with love, the clothes sound, the heart burned.
  • With money you would not know yourself, without money nobody would know you.
  • Woe to the house where the hen crows and the rooster is still.
  • Woe to the mule that sees not her master.
  • Women, wind, and fortune, soon change.
  • Words will not do for my aunt, for she does not put faith even in deeds.
  • Wounds from the knife are healed, but not those from the tongue.
  • Wounds heal, but not ill words.
  • Wounds pain most when grown cool.
  • Yesterday a cowherd, to-day a cavalier.
  • You can't have more bed-bugs than a blanket-full.
  • You can't make pancakes without breaking eggs.
  • You have broken my head and now you bring plaister.
  • You have debts, and make debts still; if you've not lied, lie you will.
  • You notice what I drink, and not the thirst I feel.
  • You surrender your freedom where you deposit your secret.
  • You used to be a baker, though now you wear gloves.
  • You want better bread than wheaten.
  • You will not be loved if you care for none but yourself.
  • Your cracked jug seems better to me than my sound one.
  • the rotten apple spoils its companion.

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