Portugese Proverbs

  • A bad knife cuts one's finger instead of the stick.
  • A barking dog was never a good hunter.
  • A barley corn is better than a diamond to a cock.
  • A beard lathered is half shaved.
  • A beard once washed is half shaven.
  • A beggar's wallet is never full.
  • A bustling mother makes a slothful daughter.
  • A contented ass enjoys a long life.
  • A dead man does not speak.
  • A dog in the manger, that neither eats nor lets others eat.
  • A dull ass near home trots without the stick.
  • A fast horse does not want the spur.
  • A fault confessed is half forgiven.
  • A fault confessed is half redressed.
  • A finger's length in a sword, and a palm in a lance, are a great advantage.
  • A friend is to be taken with his faults.
  • A friend's fault should be known but not abhorred.
  • A full man is no eater.
  • A girl, a vineyard, an orchard, and a bean-field, are hard to watch.
  • A good cock was never fat.
  • A good thing is known when it is lost.
  • A good thing is soon caught up.
  • A good word quenches more than a cauldron of water.
  • A good year is determined by its spring.
  • A goose cannot graze after him.
  • A goose, a woman, and a goat, are bad things lean.
  • A gossiping woman talks of everybody, and everybody of her.
  • A great thrust of a lance at a dead Moor.
  • A house without either a cat or a dog is the house of a scoundrel.
  • A hungry belly hears nobody.
  • A hungry wolf is not at rest.
  • A little gall spoils much honey.
  • A little injury dismays, and a great one stills.
  • A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
  • A little leak will sink a great ship.
  • A little makes a debtor and much an enemy.
  • A man of straw is better than a woman of gold.
  • A morsel eaten gains no friend.
  • A pig on credit makes a good winter and a bad spring.
  • A poor man is hungry after eating.
  • A ragged colt may make a handsome horse.
  • A rash man, a skin of good wine, and a glass vessel, do not last long.
  • A resolute heart endures no counsel.
  • A rich widow weeps with one eye and laughs with the other.
  • A rich widow weeps with one eye and signals with the other.
  • A seat in the council is honour without profit.
  • A servant and a cock must be kept but one year.
  • A shut mouth keeps me out of strife.
  • A small hatchet fells a great oak.
  • A small pack becomes a small pedler.
  • A small spark makes a great fire.
  • A small tear relieves a great sorrow.
  • A stout heart breaks ill fortune.
  • A well-formed figure needs no cloak.
  • A woman and a hen are soon lost through gadding.
  • A word and a blow.
  • A word and a stone once let go cannot be recalled.
  • A word from the mouth, a stone from the hand.
  • Alas for the son whose father went to heaven.
  • All bite the bitten dog.
  • All the wool is hair, more or less.
  • All the world loves a lover.
  • All the world will beat the man whom fortune buffets.
  • An angry man heeds no counsel.
  • An empty purse and a new house make a man wise, but too late.
  • An empty purse frights away friends.
  • An empty purse, and a finished house, make a man wise, but too late.
  • An estate inherited is the less valued.
  • An honest man's word is as good as the king's.
  • An hour of play discovers more than a year of conversation.
  • An innocent heart suspects no guile.
  • An old man in love is like a flower in winter.
  • An open box tempts an honest man.
  • An open countenance often conceals close thoughts.
  • Another man's trade costs money.
  • Another's misfortune does not cure my pain.
  • As they pipe to me, I will dance.
  • Baskets after the vintage.
  • Before you marry consider what you do.
  • Before you marry reflect, for it is a knot you cannot untie.
  • Better a distant good than a near evil.
  • Better a red face than a black heart.
  • Better a sparrow in the hand than two flying.
  • Better an ass that carries me than a horse that throws me.
  • Better an egg in peace, than an ox in war.
  • Better anticipate than be anticipated.
  • Better be killed by robbers than by the kick of an ass.
  • Better be one-eyed than quite blind.
  • Better be out of the world than out of the fashion.
  • Better be silent than speak ill.
  • Better be wrong with the many than right with the few.
  • Better deserve honour and not have it, than have it and not deserve it.
  • Better go round than be drowned.
  • Better have friends in the market-place than money in your coffer.
  • Better have to give than have to beg.
  • Better is a leap over the ditch than the entreaties of good men.
  • Better is my neighbour's hen than mine.
  • Better is one "Take this," than two "I-will-give-you."
  • Better keep, than have to beg.
  • Better lose that lose more.
  • Better mine than ours.
  • Better repair the gutter than the whole house.
  • Better straw, than nothing.
  • Between the hand and the lip the morsel may slip.
  • Beware of a door that has many keys.
  • Beware of a man that does not talk, and of a dog that does not bark.
  • Beware of a pledge that eats.
  • Beware of the dog that does not bark.
  • Birds of prey do not flock together.
  • Bite the biter.
  • Brackish water is sweet in a drought.
  • Brag is a good dog, but Holdfast is better.
  • Broken friendship may be soldered but can never be made sound.
  • Buy your greyhound, don't rear him.
  • By going gains the mill, and not by standing still.
  • Chairs sink and stools rise.
  • Change yourself, and fortune will change with you.
  • Chastise the good man, he will grow better; chastise the bad, and he will grow worse.
  • Children married, cares increased.
  • Children pick up words, as pigeons peas, And utter them again as God shall please.
  • Children should be seen and not heard.
  • Children tell in the highway what they hear by the fireside.
  • Children: one is one, two is fun, three is a houseful.
  • Choleric men are blind and mad.
  • Conceal not your secret from your friend, or you deserve to lose him.
  • Concealed goodness is a sort of vice.
  • Confess and be hanged.
  • Counterfeit coin passes current at night.
  • Crows do not peck out crow's eyes.
  • Dead men tell no tales.
  • Dear is cheap, and cheap is dear.
  • Death spares neither Pope nor beggar.
  • Death squares all accounts.
  • Deeds are love, and not sweet words.
  • Despise your enemy and you will soon be beaten.
  • Destroy the lion while he is but a whelp.
  • Do ill, and expect the like.
  • Do not rear a bird of a bad breed.
  • Don't be a baker if your head is made of butter.
  • Don't leave the high road for a short cut.
  • Don't let the bastards grind you down.
  • Don't let the cat out of the bag.
  • Don't let your sorrow come higher than your knees.
  • Don't make yourself poor to one who won't make you rich.
  • Don't pull hard enough to break the rope.
  • Don't put all you eggs in one basket.
  • Eat of your own, and call yourself mine (i.e. Be my servant and find yourself).
  • Eat the wind and swallow bitterness.
  • Eat to live, not live to eat.
  • Eat with him, and beware of him.
  • Every ant has its ire.
  • Every cock is valiant on his own dunghill.
  • Every cock will crow upon his own dunghill.
  • Every fly has its shadow.
  • Every land to its own custom, every wheel its own spindle.
  • Every man to his trade.
  • Every one is a king in his own house.
  • Every one is wise for his own profit.
  • Every one reaps as he sows.
  • Every one sings as he has the gift, and marries as he has the luck.
  • Every one speaks as he is.
  • Every one speaks of the feast as he finds it.
  • Every one to his equal.
  • Every one to his liking.
  • Every peddler praises his own needles.
  • Every pig has it Martinmas.
  • Everybody's friend or nobody's friend, is all one.
  • Everything has its time.
  • Faintheart is always in danger.
  • Fair and softly goes far in a day.
  • Favour oft avails more than justice or reason.
  • Feet accustomed to go cannot be still.
  • Feign death and the bull will leave you.
  • Follow the road and you will reach an inn.
  • Fools sometimes give wise men counsel.
  • Foot firm till death.
  • For a bad tongue scissors.
  • For a voracious beast pebbles in his feed.
  • For lack of men they made my father a justice.
  • For poor people small coin.
  • Friends and mules fail us at hard passes.
  • Friends are flowers in the garden of life.
  • Friends are known in adversity.
  • From a closed door the devil turns away.
  • From great rivers come great fish.
  • From the soldier who has no cloak, keep your own in your chest.
  • From the straws in the air we judge of the wind.
  • From the sublime to the ridiculous is only one step.
  • From the sweetest wine, the tartest vinegar.
  • Gain has a pleasant odour, come whence it will.
  • Gambling sire, gambling son.
  • Gifts break rocks.
  • Gifts from enemies are dangerous.
  • Give a grateful man more than he asks.
  • Give a hint to the man of sense, and consider the thing done.
  • Give a little, take a little.
  • Give a loaf, and beg a shive.
  • Give a man rope enough and he will hang himself.
  • Give me money, not advice.
  • Give orders, and do it yourself, and you will be rid of anxiety.
  • Give orders, and do no more, and nothing will be done.
  • Go not with every ailment to the doctor, nor with every plaint to lawyer.
  • Go not with every hunger to the cupboard, nor with every thirst to the pitcher.
  • Go to bed late, rise early, you will see your own harm and that of others.
  • Go to bed without supper, you will rise without debt.
  • Go to your rich friend's house when invited; to your poor friend's without invitation.
  • God gives clothes according to the cold.
  • God grant me to dispute with those who understand me.
  • God has given nuts to one who has no teeth.
  • God heals, and the doctor gets the money.
  • God permits, but not for ever.
  • Good and bad make up a city.
  • Good and quickly seldom meet.
  • Good fruit never comes from a bad tree.
  • Good habits result from resisting temptation.
  • Good is the delay which makes sure.
  • Good management is better than good income.
  • Good manners and plenty of money will make my son a gentlemen.
  • Good men are scarce.
  • Good table, bad will.
  • Good take heed doth surely speed.
  • Good talk saves the food.
  • Good things come in small packages.
  • Good wind needs no bush.
  • Good words and bad acts deceive both wise and wimple.
  • Hard upon hard does not make a good wall.
  • He avoided the fly and swallowed the spider.
  • He buys very dear who begs.
  • He doubts nothing who knows nothing.
  • He has a head, and so has a pin.
  • He has nothing who is not content with what he has.
  • He has nothing, for whom nothing is enough.
  • He is an old saint, any may leave it in the hands of God.
  • He is no friend that eats his own by himself, and mine with me.
  • He is no great heir that inherits not his ancestor's virtues.
  • He is your friend who gets you out of a scrape.
  • He keeps his road well enough who gets rid of bad company.
  • He never was a friend who ceased to be so for a slight cause.
  • He should not complain of being cheated who buys the cloth by the sample.
  • He that does ill never wants for excuses.
  • He that will, does more that he that can.
  • He that would be old long must begin betimes.
  • He that would keep his eye sound must tie up his hand.
  • He threatens many who affronts one.
  • He threatens who is afraid.
  • He who has a glass roof must not throw stones at his neighbour's.
  • He who has a good next, finds good friends.
  • He who has four and spends five, has no need of a purse.
  • He who is well prepared has won the battle.
  • He who knows little soon blabs it.
  • He who make more of you than he is wont, either means to cheat you or wants you.
  • He who makes one basket can make a hundred.
  • He who would catch fish must not mind wetting himself.
  • He who would catch fish, must not mind getting wet.
  • Hedgehogs are not to be killed with the fist.
  • Honey is not for the ass's mouth.
  • Honour a good man that he may honour you, and a bad man that he may not dishonour you.
  • Honour and profit will not keep in one sack.
  • How did you rear so many children? By being fondest of the little ones.
  • Hunger and cold surrender a man to his enemy.
  • I am on good terms with the friend who eats his bread with me.
  • I hate fetters though they be of gold.
  • I have nothing for dinner, sit down to table.
  • I kiss thee hide, because thou art to be a wine-bag.
  • I meant to cross myself and put out one of my eyes.
  • I renounce the friend who eats what is mine with me, and what is his own by himself.
  • I renounce the golden basin in which I have to spit blood.
  • I saw a man, who saw another man, who saw the sea.
  • I see by my daughter's face when the devil lays hold of my son-in-law.
  • I want more for my teeth than for my relations.
  • If a poor man gives to you, he expects more in return.
  • If a rich man ate a snake, they would say it was because of his wisdom.
  • If you have a friend who is a physician, send him to your enemy's house.
  • If you know what a dollar is worth, try to borrow it.
  • If you laugh to-day, you will cry to-morrow.
  • If you want clear water, draw it from the spring.
  • If you want to be served, serve yourself.
  • If you would be a good judge, hear what every one says.
  • If you would be healthy, be sage betimes.
  • If you would be in good repute, let not the sun find you in bed.
  • If you would grow poor without perceiving it, employ workmen and go to sleep.
  • Ill befal the belly that forgets eaten bread.
  • Ill fares the young bird in the urchin's hand.
  • In default of bread, meal cakes are good.
  • In war, hunting, and love, for one pleasure a hundred pains.
  • Iron that is not used soon rusts.
  • It befits the king to be liberal, for he is sure of never falling into poverty.
  • It dawns none the sooner for all one's early rising.
  • It fares ill with the house when the distaff commands the sword.
  • It is bad to have a servant, but worse to have a master.
  • It is nothing, they are only killing my husband.
  • It is the nature of the greyhound to carry a long tail.
  • It is well to know how to be silent till it is time to speak.
  • Jack is as good as his master.
  • Jack of all trades and master of none.
  • Jack will never make a gentleman.
  • Keep good company and you shall be of the number.
  • Keep no more cats than will catch mice.
  • Keep no more cats that will catch mice.
  • King's entreaties are commands.
  • Kings have long arms.
  • Laws go where dollars please.
  • Laws go where money pleases.
  • Lay your hand on your bosom and you will not speak ill of another.
  • Layovers for meddlers.
  • Lean meat from a fat pig.
  • Let every man look to the bread upon which he must depend.
  • Let every man mind his own business, and leave others to theirs.
  • Let every one be content with what God has given him.
  • Let every sheep hand by its own leg.
  • Let him eat the tough morsel who eat the tender.
  • Let not him that has a mouth ask another to blow.
  • Let not the bottom of your purse or of your mind be seen.
  • Let the dog bark at me, so he don't bite me.
  • Let the giver be silent and the receiver speak.
  • Like father, like son.
  • Like king, like law; like law, like people.
  • Little chips kindle fire, and big logs sustain it.
  • Live to live and you will learn to live.
  • Love has no law.
  • Love knows no law.
  • Lovers' quarrels are love redoubled.
  • Lying pays no tax.
  • Mad as a wet hen.
  • Make a silver bridge for a flying enemy.
  • Make good flour and you need no trumpet.
  • Make the night night, and the day day, and you will live pleasantly.
  • Make your son you heir and not your steward.
  • Many kiss the hand they would gladly see cut off.
  • Many little makes a mickle.
  • Marry me forthwith, mother, for my face is growing wrinkled.
  • Marry, marry, and what about the housekeeping.
  • Marry, marry, sounds well but tastes ill.
  • Martha sings well when she has had her fill.
  • Meddle not in what you don't understand.
  • Michael, Michael, you have no bees, and yet you sell honey!
  • Money is not gained by losing time.
  • Money is the measure of all things.
  • Money is the root of all evil.
  • Money lent, an enemy made.
  • Money makes a man.
  • Money soothes more than the words of a cavalier.
  • Money wins the battle, not the long arm.
  • More grows in a garden than the gardener sows there.
  • More haste, less speed.
  • Mouth of honey, heart of gall.
  • Much caution does no harm.
  • Much chatter, little wit.
  • Much coin, much care.
  • Much cry and little wool.
  • Much laughter, little wit.
  • Much law, but little justice.
  • Much meat, much maladies.
  • Much straw and little corn.
  • My chest locked, my soul safe.
  • My life and soul at your service, but not the pack-saddle.
  • My money, your money, let us go to the tavern.
  • Neither handsome enough to kill nor ugly enough to frighten away.
  • Neither trust or contend, nor lay wagers or lend, and you'll have peace to your end.
  • Never cut what can be untied.
  • Never mention a rope in the house of a thief.
  • Never mention rope in the house of a man who has been hanged.
  • Never say, of this water I will not drink, of this bread I will not eat.
  • No one has seen to-morrow.
  • No one is a good judge in his own cause.
  • No one is always right.
  • No one is content with his lot.
  • No one is poor but he who thinks himself so.
  • No woman is ugly if she is well dressed.
  • No word is ill spoken, that is not ill taken.
  • No. 1 is the first house in the row.
  • Not all that is true is to be spoken.
  • Of evils, choose the least.
  • Of oil, wine, and friends, the oldest.
  • Of soup and love, the first is the best.
  • Of the good man a good pledge, and of the bad neither pledge nor surety.
  • Of two cowards, the one who attacks conquers the other.
  • One bird in the hand is worth two flying.
  • One grain does not full the granary, but it helps its companion.
  • One wolf does not kill another.
  • One wrong submitted to, another follows.
  • One year's seeding makes seven years weeding.
  • Open your purse, and I will open my mouth.
  • Other times, other counsels.
  • Pay what you owe, you will get well of your malady.
  • Peace with a cudgel in hand is war.
  • Pigs in the cold and men in drink make a great noise.
  • Play with an ass, and he will slap your face with his tail.
  • Poverty never sped well in love.
  • Poverty parteth friends.
  • Pray to the saint until you have passed the slough.
  • Prepare a nest for the hen and she will lay eggs for you.
  • Promising is not giving, but serves to content fools.
  • Rather a husband with one eye than with one son.
  • Rather go rob with good men than pray with bad.
  • Rather lose the wool than the sheep.
  • Right or wrong, our house up to the roof.
  • Rise early, and you will observe; labour, and you will have.
  • Rosary is hand, the devil at heart.
  • Saints appear to fools.
  • Saints don't fill the belly.
  • Seat yourself in your place, and they will not make you rise.
  • Send a man of sense on the embassy, and you need not instruct him.
  • Serve a lord, and you will know what it is to be vexed.
  • Show me a poor man, I will show you a flatterer.
  • Shut your door, and you will make your neighbour good.
  • Shut your mouth and you'll catch no flies.
  • Soft water constantly striking the hard stone, wears it at last.
  • Soft words and hard arguments.
  • Speak little and well, they will think you somebody.
  • Spilt salt is never well collected.
  • Spinner, spin softly, you disturb me; I am praying.
  • Supper is soon served up in a plentiful house.
  • Taking out without putting in, soon comes to the bottom.
  • Talk of the wolf and behold his skin.
  • Tell her she is handsome, and you will turn her brain.
  • Tell me with whom thou goest, and I'll tell thee what thou doest.
  • Tell your friends a lie; if he keeps it secret tell him the truth.
  • The Frenchman sings well, when his throat is moistened.
  • The accomplice is as bad as the thief.
  • The ass dead, the corn at his tail.
  • The ass does not know the value of his tail till he has lost it.
  • The ass embraced the thistle, and they found themselves relations.
  • The ass of many owners is eaten by wolves.
  • The ass that is hungry eats thistles.
  • The ass that trespasses on a stranger's premises will leave them laden with wood (i.e. cudgelled).
  • The ass well knows in whose house he brays.
  • The ass's son brays one hour daily.
  • The beast that goes well never wants a rider to try its paces.
  • The belly does not accept bail.
  • The belly warm, the foot at rest.
  • The bigger the river the bigger the fish.
  • The bigger they are, the harder they fall.
  • The bird hunting a locust is unaware of the hawk hunting him.
  • The blind man has picked up a coin.
  • The blunders of physicians are covered by the earth.
  • The cat is a good friend, only she scratches.
  • The cat well knows whose beard she licks.
  • The dead open the eyes of the living.
  • The devil is not so ugly as he is painted.
  • The dog that barks much is never good for hunting.
  • The dog that barks much, bites little.
  • The envious man's face grows lean and his eye swells.
  • The fingers of the same hand are not alike.
  • The fisherman fishes in troubled water.
  • The fool passes for wise if he is silent.
  • The fox knows much, but more he that catcheth him.
  • The gentle calf sucks all the cows.
  • The guests will go away, and we will eat the pasty.
  • The headache is mine and the cows are ours.
  • The hen that stays at home picks up the crumbs.
  • The hen's eyes turn to where she has her eggs.
  • The horse's best allowance is his master's eye.
  • The key at the girdle keeps me good and my neighbour too.
  • The king of the bees has no sting.
  • The lame goat does not take a siesta.
  • The law devised, its evasion contrived.
  • The lazy servant takes eight steps to avoid one.
  • The loss which your neighbour does not know is no real loss.
  • The loudest bark rids not a dog of his fleas.
  • The mad dog bites its master.
  • The malady that is more incurable is folly.
  • The man of sense does not hang up his knowledge.
  • The man of your own trade is your enemy.
  • The mare's kicks are caresses to the colt.
  • The master orders the man, the man orders the cat, and the cat orders her tail.
  • The mouth that says "Yes," can say "No."
  • The nest made, the bird dead.
  • The old saints are forgotten in the new.
  • The one-eyes is a king in the land of the blind.
  • The only good Indian is a dead Indian.
  • The ox that tossed me threw me into a good place.
  • The poor man eats at double cost.
  • The pot that boils too much loses its flavour.
  • The rat does not leave the cat's house with a bellyful.
  • The rat that knows but one hole is soon caught.
  • The rat which has but one hole is soon caught.
  • The righteous pays for the sinner.
  • The ripest fruit will not fall into your mouth.
  • The savage ox grows tame on strange ground.
  • The son-in-law's sack is never full.
  • The sooner begun, the sooner done.
  • The sooty oven mocks the black chimney.
  • The swindler readily cheats the covetous man.
  • The tailor ill-dressed, the shoemaker ill-shod.
  • The thief becomes the gallows well.
  • The thief proceeds from a needle to gold, and from gold to the gallows.
  • The tired mare goes willingly to grass.
  • The tongue goes to the aching tooth.
  • The treason approved, the traitor abhorred.
  • The wine-skin has its reasons for smelling of pitch.
  • The wolf is well pleased with the kick of a sheep.
  • The worst pig eats the best acorn.
  • The worth of a thing is what it will bring.
  • There are ills that happen for good.
  • There die as many lambs as wethers.
  • There is never wanting a dog to bark at you.
  • There is no day without its night.
  • There is no pleasure that does not pall, the more so if it costs nothing.
  • There is plenty of corn in Castile, but he who has none, starves.
  • There is reason in the roasting of eggs.
  • There's no catching trouts with dry breeches.
  • There's no compassion like the penny.
  • There's no handsome woman on the wedding day, except the bride.
  • There's no living without friends.
  • Think of many things, do one.
  • Thinking is not knowing.
  • Thinking of where you are going, you forget whence you came.
  • Third time is the charm.
  • Third time lucky.
  • Third time pays for all.
  • Though the heron flied high the falcon kills it.
  • Though the mastiff be gentle, yet bite him not by the lip.
  • Though we are negroes, we are men, and have souls.
  • Though we may pluck flowers by the way we may not sleep among flowers.
  • Though your mastiff be gentle, do not bite his lip.
  • Threads do not break for being fine, but for being gouty and ill-spun.
  • Threatened folks eat bread.
  • Three brothers, three fortresses.
  • Three or four daily will bring you to the bottom of the sack.
  • Time and the hour are not to be tied with a rope.
  • Times passes like the wind.
  • Times tries a'.
  • To a hasty question a leisurely answer.
  • To be slow in giving ant to refuse, are alike.
  • To change one's habits smacks of death.
  • To give is honour, to beg is dishonour.
  • To love and be wise is incompatible.
  • To promise much means giving little.
  • To sell honey to one who keeps hives.
  • To separate the men from the boys.
  • To the bold man Fortune holds out her hand.
  • To the lean pig a fat acorn.
  • Too much familiarity breeds contempt.
  • Too much wax burns the church.
  • Trust not a dog that limps.
  • Trust not a horse's heels.
  • Trust not a new friend or an old enemy.
  • Trust not tow with firebrands, not a woman with men.
  • Truth and oil come to the surface.
  • Two eyes see more than one.
  • Under a shabby cloak may be a smart drinker.
  • Under fair words beware of fraud.
  • Under the sackcloth there is something else.
  • Vile let him be who deems himself vile.
  • Visits always give pleasure, if not the arrival, the departure.
  • War is sweet to him who does not go to it.
  • Water washes everything.
  • We have not saddled and yet we are riding.
  • What is another's always sighs for its master.
  • What is marriage, mother? Daughter, it is spinning, bearing children, and weeping.
  • What was hard to bear is sweet to remember.
  • What water gives, water takes away.
  • What's everybody's work is nobody's work.
  • When bulls fight, woe to the frogs.
  • When thieves fall out, their knaveries come to light.
  • Where shall the ox go but he must labour, since he knows how?
  • Where shall the ox go, and not have to plough?
  • Where the cock is the hen does not crow.
  • Where there is life there is hope.
  • Where there is little bread, cut first.
  • Where there is no fire, no smoke rises.
  • Where there is no honour there is no dishonour.
  • Where there's no fire there's no smoke.
  • Where there's no might there's no right.
  • Where you tell your secret you surrender your freedom.
  • Where you were a page, be not an esquire.
  • Who eats his fowl alone, must saddle his horse alone.
  • Who faints not, achieves.
  • Who holds his peace and gathers stones, will find a time to throw them.
  • Who will not when he can, can't when he will.
  • Will he nill he, the ass must go the fair.
  • Win a bet of your friend, and drink it on the spot.
  • Wind and fortune are not lasting.
  • Wipe your sore eye with your elbow.
  • Woman, wind, and luck soon change.
  • Women and glass are always in danger.
  • Women are supernumerary when present, and missed when absent.
  • Work done expects money.
  • Work expands so as to fill the time available.
  • Would you have me serve you, good king, give me the means of living.
  • Would you have potatoes grow by the pot-side?
  • Would you know your daughter? See her in company.
  • You can't make a good shaft of a pig's tail.
  • You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.
  • You can't make horn of a pig's tail.
  • You have lent and not recovered; and if recovered, not so much; and if so much, not such; and if such, a mortal enemy.
  • You have many strings to your bow.
  • You may keep yourself safe from fire, but not from a bad man.
  • You need not find a shelter for an old ox.
  • You will not see many with green eyes.
  • Your wife and sheep early at home.
  • Your windmill dwindles into a nutcrack.

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