Italian Proverbs

  • 'Tis a silly sheep that confesses to the wolf.
  • 'Tis good feasting in other men's houses.
  • A bad agreement is better than a good lawsuit.
  • A barking cur does not bite.
  • A barking dog never bites.
  • A beautiful woman smiling, bespeaks a purse weeping.
  • A beetle is a beauty in the eyes of his mother.
  • A bird in the cage is worth a hundred at large.
  • A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
  • A blind man is not judge of colours.
  • A book whose sale's forbidden all men rush to see, and prohibition turns one reader into three.
  • A braying ass eats little hay.
  • A calm portends a storm.
  • A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle.
  • A cat pent up becomes a lion.
  • A cat that licks the spit is not to be trusted with roast meat.
  • A clear bargain, a dear friend.
  • A cloak is not made for a single shower of rain.
  • A closed mouth catches no flies.
  • A cracked pot never fell off the hook.
  • A cur's tail grows fast.
  • A dead man does not make war.
  • A dog is never offended at being pelted with bones.
  • A dog never bit me but I had some of his hair.
  • A dog that bites silently. [An insidious tradcuer. He would kill you with an air-gun.]
  • A drop of water breaks a stone.
  • A drowning man would catch at razors.
  • A drunk man's words are a sober man's thoughts.
  • A farthing saved is twice earned.
  • A fat kitchen is next door to poverty.
  • A fat kitchen, a lean testament.
  • A fine shot never killed a bird.
  • A fool can ask more questions than seven wise men can answer.
  • A fool carveth a piece of his heart to every one that sits near him.
  • A fool finds no pleasure in understanding but delights in airing his own opinions.
  • A fool finds pleasure in evil conduct, but a man of understanding delights in wisdom.
  • A fool gives full vent to his anger, but a wise man keeps himself under control.
  • A fool throws a stone into a well, and it requires a hundred wise men to get it out again.
  • A fools knows his own business better than a wise man knows that of others.
  • A forced kindness deserves no thanks.
  • A friend is not known till he is lost.
  • A friend, and look to thyself.
  • A full sack pricks up its ear.
  • A gift delayed, and long expected, is not given, but sold dear.
  • A gift long expected is sold, not given.
  • A gift long waited for is sold, not given.
  • A gift with a kind countenance is a double present.
  • A gold key opens every door.
  • A gold ring does not cure a felon.
  • A good anvil does not fear the hammer.
  • A good appetite does not want sauce.
  • A good cavalier never lacks a lance.
  • A good horse and a bad horse need the spur; a good woman and a bad woman need the stick.
  • A good horse cannot be of a bad color.
  • A good horse never lacks a saddle.
  • A good paymaster does not hesitate to give good security.
  • A good thing lost is valued.
  • A greased mouth cannot say no.
  • A great church and little devotion.
  • A great liar has need of good memory.
  • A great man will not trample on a worm, nor sneak to an emperor.
  • A hair of the dog cures the bite.
  • A happy heart is better than a full purse.
  • A hard beginning maketh a good ending.
  • A heavy shower is soon over.
  • A horse falls though he has four legs.
  • A horse grown fat kicks.
  • A hundred years cannot repair a moment's loss of honour.
  • A hungry ass eats any straw.
  • A hungry dog does not fear the stick.
  • A jade eats as much as a good horse.
  • A kitchen dog never was good for the chase.
  • A lean horse does not kick.
  • A little gall make a great deal of honey bitter.
  • A little man often casts a long shadow.
  • A little stone overturns a great cart.
  • A little stream drives a great mill.
  • A little truth makes the whole lie pass.
  • A living ass is better than a dead doctor.
  • A living dog is been than a dead lion.
  • A lover's anger is short-lived.
  • A loving man, a jealous man.
  • A mad parish, a mad priest.
  • A man of straw needs a woman of gold.
  • A man of words and not of deeds Is like a garden full of weeds.
  • A man should learn to sail in all winds.
  • A man's own opinion is never wrong.
  • A market is three women and a goose.
  • A married man is a caged bird.
  • A meal without wine is like a day without sunshine.
  • A mild sheep is suck by every lamb.
  • A mill and a wife are always in want of something.
  • A mill cannot grind with the water that is past.
  • A mischievous dog must be tied short.
  • A misfortune and a friar seldom go alone.
  • A mouse will scare a thief.
  • A muffled cat is no good mouser.
  • A near neighbour is better than a distant cousin.
  • A new broom is good for three days.
  • A new net won't catch an old bird.
  • A pitcher that goes oft to the well is broken at last.
  • A place for everything, and everything in its place.
  • A proud pauper and a rich miser are contemptible beings.
  • A ragged coat finds little credit.
  • A ragged sack holds no grain, a poor man is not taken into counsel.
  • A rainy morn oft brings a pleasant day.
  • A rotting fish begins to stink at the head.
  • A runaway horse punishes himself.
  • A saddle fits more backs than one.
  • A sailor must have his eye trained to the rocks and sands as well as the north star.
  • A scalded dog thinks cold water hot.
  • A scorpion never stung me but I cured myself with its grease.
  • A secret imparted is no longer a secret.
  • A sheep's bite is never more than skip deep.
  • A short tail won't keep off flies.
  • A shut mouth catches no flies.
  • A sin concealed is half forgiven.
  • A sin confessed is half forgiven.
  • A slothful man never has time.
  • A solitary man is either a brute or an angel.
  • A starved town is soon forced to surrender.
  • A stick is soon found to beat a dog.
  • A stout heart overcomes ill fortune.
  • A thing done has a head. (The exultation of an ancient sculptor on his satisfactorily completing the head of his statue.)
  • A thing is never much talked of but there is some truth in it.
  • A thousand probabilities do not make one truth.
  • A threatened buffet is never well given.
  • A tree often transplanted is never loaded with fruit.
  • A vagabond monk never spoke well of his convent.
  • A voluntary burthen is no burthen.
  • A volunteer is worth twenty pressed men.
  • A waiting appetite kindles many a spite.
  • A wise man and a fool together, know more than a wise man alone.
  • A wise man does at first what a fool must do at last.
  • A woman who loves to be at the window is like a bunch of grapes on the wayside.
  • A woman's answer is never to seek.
  • A woman's in pain, a woman's in woe, a woman is ill, when she likes to be so.
  • A woman's place is in the home.
  • A wound foreseen paint the less.
  • Absence is a foe to love; out of sight out of mind.
  • After one pope another is made.
  • After the game, the king and the pawn go into the same box.
  • Agree between yourselves (as to the time), quoth Arlotto, and I will make it rain.
  • All are brave when the enemy flies.
  • All are not saints who go to church.
  • All is not butter that comes from the cow.
  • All saints do not work miracles.
  • All ships leak: some amidships, some in the bows, some in the hold.
  • All tastes are tastes.
  • All that's fair must fade.
  • All the brains are not in one head.
  • All the fingers are not alike.
  • All the flowers of tomorrow are in the seeds of yesterday.
  • All the honey a bee gathers during its lifetime doesn't sweeten its sting.
  • All the sheep are not for the wolf.
  • All water runs to the sea.
  • Among men of honour a word is a bond.
  • Among thorns grow roses.
  • An ambassador beareth no blame.
  • An ass's tail will not make a sieve.
  • An ass's trot does not last long.
  • An eagle will not catch flies.
  • An idle man is the devil's bolster.
  • An old dog does not grow used to the collar.
  • An old dog will learn no tricks.
  • An old flag is an honour to its captain.
  • An old horse for a young soldier.
  • An old quarrel is easily renewed.
  • An ounce of discretion is better than a pound of knowledge.
  • An unasked for excuse infers transgression.
  • Anger can be an expensive luxury.
  • Anger increases love.
  • Any excuse is good if it hold good.
  • Any man can be a father, but it takes a special person to be a dad.
  • Any plan is bad that cannot be changed.
  • Any port in a storm.
  • Any publicity is good publicity.
  • Any water will put out fire.
  • Anyone who is satisfied to stand still should not complain when others pass him.
  • Appetite comes in eating.
  • Argus at home, a mole abroad.
  • Arms carry peace.
  • As both a good horse and a bad horse heed the spur, so both a good woman and a bad woman need the stick.
  • As demure as an old whore at a christening.
  • As is the lover so is the beloved.
  • As you would have a daughter so choose a wife.
  • Ask my chum if I am a thief.
  • Ask my companion if I be a thief.
  • Ask which was born first, the hen or the egg.
  • Asking costs little.
  • At a dangerous passage yield precedence.
  • At a good bargain pause and ponder.
  • At a great pennyworth pause awhile.
  • At a great river be the last to pass.
  • At a round table there is no dispute about place.
  • At an open chest the righteous sins.
  • At last the foxes all meet at the furrier's.
  • At table bashfulness is out of place.
  • At the end of the game we see who wins.
  • At the end of the game you'll see who's the winner.
  • At the end of the work you may judge of the workmen.
  • Bad grass does not make good hay.
  • Bad is the sack that will not bear patching.
  • Bad is the wool that cannot be died.
  • Bad news is the first to come.
  • Be the horse good or bad always wear your spurs.
  • Be the same thing that ye wa'd be ca'd.
  • Beat the churl and he will be your friend.
  • Believe a boaster as you would a liar.
  • Below the navel there is neither religion nor truth.
  • Bend the tree while it is young.
  • Better a lean agreement than a fat sentence.
  • Better a near neighbour than a distant cousin.
  • Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow.
  • Better be a bird of the wood than a bird in the cage.
  • Better be the head of a cat than the tail of a lion.
  • Better be the head of a lizard than the tail of a dragon.
  • Better give than not to have to give.
  • Better give the wool than the sheep.
  • Better have an egg to-day than a hen to-morrow.
  • Better have one bee than a host of flies.
  • Better is an enemy to well.
  • Better lose the saddle than the horse.
  • Better once than never.
  • Better slip with the foot than with the tongue.
  • Better to ask than go astray.
  • Better to fall from the window than the roof.
  • Between saying and doing, many a pair of shoes is worn out.
  • Between the hand and the mouth the soup is spilt.
  • Between two cowards, he has the advantage who first detects the other.
  • Beware of "Had I but known."
  • Beware of a poor alchemist.
  • Beware of one who has nothing to lose.
  • Beware of the vinegar of sweet wine.
  • Beware of vinegar made of sweet wine.
  • Beware the person with nothing to lose.
  • Big flies break the spider's web.
  • Big mouthfuls often choke.
  • Blessed is the misfortune that comes alone.
  • Blessings brighten as they take their flight.
  • Blows are not given upon conditions.
  • Blue are the hills that are far away.
  • Boil not the pap before the child is born.
  • Boil stones in butter, and you may sip the broth.
  • Borderers are either thieves or murderers.
  • Borrowed garments never sit well.
  • Broad thongs may be cut from other men's leather.
  • Buy the bed of a great debtor.
  • By asking for the impossible, obtain the best possible.
  • By lamplight every country wench seems handsome.
  • By night all cats are black.
  • By their marks the bales are known.
  • Eggs have no business dancing with stones.
  • Empty vessels make most noise.
  • Enough is enough, and too much spoils.
  • Entreat the churl and the bargain is broken off.
  • Error is no payment.
  • Even a fly has its anger.
  • Even a fly has its spleen.
  • Even a fool is thought wise if he keeps silent, and discerning if he holds his tongue.
  • Even a frog would bite if it had teeth.
  • Even a horse, though he has four feet, stumbles.
  • Even among the apostles there was a Judas.
  • Even an ass will not fall twice in the same quicksand.
  • Even foxes are caught.
  • Even old foxes are caught in the snare.
  • Even the dog gets bread by wagging his tail.
  • Even the fool says a wise word sometimes.
  • Even the just has need of help.
  • Even the sea. great as it is, grows calm.
  • Even woods have ears.
  • Evening red and morning grey help the traveler on his way; evening grey and morning red bring down rain upon his head.
  • Ever drunk, ever dry.
  • Every bird thinks its own nest beautiful.
  • Every day has it night.
  • Every ditch is full of after-wit.
  • Every ditch is full of your after-wits.
  • Every dog is a lion at home.
  • Every dog is allowed one bite.
  • Every fool is wise when he holds his tongue.
  • Every fool wants to give advice.
  • Every fox likes a henroost.
  • Every hill has its valley.
  • Every man has a fool in his sleeve.
  • Every man has a good wife and a bad trade.
  • Every one can navigate in fine weather.
  • Every one finds fault with his own trade.
  • Every one gives himself credit for more brains than he has, and less money.
  • Every one goes with his own sack to the mill.
  • Every one likes justice in another's house, none in his own.
  • Every one praises his own saint.
  • Every one thinks he has more than his share of brains.
  • Every one thinks himself without sin because he has not those of others.
  • Every one thinks his own cross heaviest.
  • Every one to his own calling, and the ox to the plough.
  • Every potter praises his pot, and most of all the one that is cracked.
  • Every promise is a debt.
  • Every reed will not make a pipe.
  • Every rose has its thorn.
  • Every saint has his festival.
  • Every shop has its trick.
  • Every ten years one man has need of another.
  • Every time history repeats itself the price goes up.
  • Every time the sheep bleats it loseth a mouthful.
  • Every truth is not good to be told.
  • Every vine must have its stake.
  • Every wind does not shake down the nut.
  • Everybody's friend, nobody's friend.
  • Everyone thinks his own cross is heaviest.
  • Everything is good for something.
  • Everything is good in its season.
  • Everything is of every year.
  • Everything may be borne except good fortune.
  • Everything may be repaired except the neckbone.
  • Everything new is beautiful.
  • Evil be to him who evil thinks.
  • Evil communications corrupt good manners.
  • Evil does are evil dreaders.
  • Extravagant offers are a kind of denial.
  • Fair promises bind fools.
  • Fair words won't feed a cat.
  • Fair words, but look to your purse.
  • Faith in a lord, a cap for the fool.
  • Far from the eyes, far from the heart.
  • Fat head, less brains.
  • Feather by feather the goose is plucked.
  • February fill dyke, be it black or be it white.
  • Feed a cold and starve a fever.
  • Fire drives the wasp out of its nest.
  • Fire is not quenched with fire.
  • Flies don't light on a boiling pot.
  • Flies flock to the lean horse.
  • For a wife and a horse go to your neighbour.
  • For an honest man half his wits are enough; the whole is too little for a knave.
  • For extreme ills extreme remedies.
  • For the buyer a hundred eyes are too few, for the seller one is enough.
  • For the flying enemy a golden bridge.
  • Forbidden fruit is sweetest.
  • Fortune comes to him who strives for it.
  • Fortune helps fools.
  • Fortune, and go to sleep.
  • Fortunes, heaven-born gifts.
  • Friar Modest never was a prior.
  • Friends in need are friends indeed.
  • Friends may meet, but mountains never greet.
  • Friends tie their purses with a spider's web.
  • Friendship should be unpicked, not rent.
  • Friendships are cheap when they can be brought by doffing the hat.
  • Frightened at bugbears.
  • From a bad paymaster take straw - i.e. any trifle.
  • From saying to doing is a long way.
  • From shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations.
  • From snow whether cooked or pounded you will get nothing but water.
  • From still water God keep me; from running water I will keep myself.
  • From the same flower the bee extracts honey and the wasp gall.
  • From those I trust God guard me, from those I mistrust I will guard myself.
  • Gifts are often losses.
  • Give a clown your finger he'll grasp your fist.
  • Give a dog an ill name, and you may as well hang him.
  • Give the priest drink, for the clerk is thirsty.
  • Give the wise man a hint and leave him to act.
  • Give time time.
  • Give to him that has.
  • Giving is fishing.
  • Glowworms are not lanterns.
  • Gluttony kills more than the sword.
  • Gnaw the bone which is fallen to thy lot.
  • Go abroad and you'll hear news of home.
  • Go softly at bad bits of road.
  • Go to the sea if you would fish well.
  • God gives a curst one short horns.
  • God heals and the doctor has the thanks.
  • God keep me from my friends, from my enemies I will keep myself.
  • God preserve you from one who eats without drinking.
  • God save me from him who has but one occupation.
  • God save me from him who studies but one book.
  • God save me from one who does not drink.
  • God save you from a bad neighbour, and from a beginner on the fiddle.
  • God sends cold according to the clothes.
  • God sends nothing but what can be borne.
  • Gold does not buy everything.
  • Good blood never lies.
  • Good is good, but better beats it.
  • Good or bad we must all live.
  • Good repute is like the cypress: once cut, it never puts forth leaf again.
  • Good riding at two anchors men have told, For it one break, the other yet may hold.
  • Good ware was never dear.
  • Good watch prevents misfortune.
  • Good wine makes good blood.
  • Grease to the wheels.
  • Great cry and little wool, as the man said who shaved the sow.
  • Great griefs are mute.
  • Great smoke, little roast.
  • Greater fools than they of Zago, who dunged the steeple to make it grow.
  • Half a brain is enough for him who says little.
  • Handsome is not what is handsome, but what pleases.
  • Handsome women generally fall to the lot of ugly men.
  • Happy is she who is in love with an old dotard.
  • Happy is the bride that the sun shines on.
  • Happy is the country which has no history.
  • Hard is a new law imposed on old licence.
  • Hard upon hard never made a good wall.
  • Hard words break no bones.
  • Hard work never did anyone any harm.
  • Hatred renewed is worse than at first.
  • Have luck, and sleep.
  • Have not all your eggs in one nest.
  • Have two strings to your bow.
  • He begins to grow bad who believes himself good.
  • He cannot lead a good life who serves without wages.
  • He cries out before he is hurt.
  • He cries wine, and sells vinegar.
  • He devil is not so ugly as he is painted.
  • He devil tempts all, but the idle man tempts the devil.
  • He gains much who loses a vain hope.
  • He got out of the mud and fell into the river.
  • He has done like the Perugian who, when his head was broken, ran home for his helmet.
  • He hauls at a long rope who expects another's death.
  • He is a fool who boasts of four things: that he has good wine, a good horse, a handsome wife, and plenty of money.
  • He is a fool who does not know from what quarter the wind blows.
  • He is a fool who loses the flight for the leap.
  • He is a very sorry barber who has but one comb.
  • He is in no place who is everywhere.
  • He is in search of a ram with five feet.
  • He is like the anchor that is always in the sea, yet does not learn to swim.
  • He is master of another man's life who is indifferent to his own.
  • He is miserable indeed that must lock up his miseries.
  • He is miserable once, who feels it; but twice, who fear it before it comes.
  • He is not a good mason who refuses any stone.
  • He is not a man who cannot say no.
  • He is not a thorough wise man who cannot play the fool on occasion.
  • He is not a wise man who cannot play the fool on occasions.
  • He is not an honest man who has burned his tongue and does not tell the company that the soup is hot.
  • He is not free who drags his chain after him.
  • He is not happy who knows it not.
  • He is not poor that hath not much, but he that craves much.
  • He is rich enough who does not want.
  • He is the world's master who despises it, its slave who prizes it.
  • He is very blind who cannot see the sun.
  • He is washing the crow.
  • He is well constituted who grieves not for what he has not, and rejoices for what he has.
  • He is wise who learns at another's cost.
  • He knows well where the thorn pricks him.
  • He knows where the devil carries his tail.
  • He knows where the devil has his tail.
  • He laughs well who laughs last.
  • He loves well who does not forget.
  • He may lie safely who comes from afar.
  • He measures others with his own yard.
  • He must stoop that has a low door.
  • He ought not to complain of the sea who returns to it a second time.
  • He runs far who never turns.
  • He saith little that loveth much.
  • He sells the bird on the branch.
  • He sets the wolf to guard the sheep.
  • He takes out a nail and puts in a pin.
  • He that at twenty is not, at thirty knows not, and at forty has not, will never be, nor ever know, nor ever have.
  • He that buys the office of magistrate must of necessity sell justice.
  • He that by the plough would thrive, Himself must either hold or drive.
  • He that exceeds his commission must answer for it at his own cost.
  • He that has a head of glass must not throw stones at another.
  • He that has but one pig easily fattens it.
  • He that has swallowed the devil may swallow his horns.
  • He that is afraid of the devil does not grow rich.
  • He that is always right is always wrong.
  • He that is drowning shouts though he be not heard.
  • He that is drunk is gone from home.
  • He that is good for something is the ass of the public.
  • He that is in fault is in suspicion.
  • He that is kinder than he was wont hath a design upon thee.
  • He that jokes, confesses.
  • He that keepeth his mouth keepeth his life; but he that openeth wide his lips shall have destruction.
  • He that keeps another man's dog shall have nothing left him but the line.
  • He that makes himself dirt is trod on by the swine.
  • He that never fails never grows rich.
  • He that paints a flower does not give it perfume.
  • He that passeth by, and meddleth with strife belonging not to him, is like one that taketh a dog by the ears.
  • He that seeks to have many friends never has any.
  • He that seeks, finds, and sometimes what he would rather not.
  • He that shows his money shows his judgment.
  • He that shows his passion, tells his enemy where he may hit him.
  • He that stands may fall.
  • He that wants should not be bashful.
  • He that will not strive in this world should not have come into it.
  • He that would be ill served should keep plenty of servants.
  • He that would beat his dog can easily find a stick.
  • He that would have a thing done quickly and well must do it himself.
  • He that would have eggs must endure the cackling of hens.
  • He that would have the fruit, must climb the tree.
  • He that would heal a wound must not handle it.
  • He wastes his tears who weeps before the judge.
  • He who begins ill finishes worse.
  • He who begins many things finishes few.
  • He who blows dust fills his eyes with it.
  • He who builds a house in the market-place, builds either too high or too low.
  • He who builds by the roadside has many surveyors.
  • He who builds on another's ground loses his stone and mortar.
  • He who buys betimes buys cheaply.
  • He who buys by the pennyworth keeps his own house and other men's too.
  • He who buys the broom can also buy the handle.
  • He who buys what he cannot pay for, sells what he would rather not.
  • He who can wait obtains what he wishes.
  • He who cannot revenge himself is weak, he who will not is contemptible.
  • He who chastises one threatens a hundred.
  • He who climbs to high is near a fall.
  • He who decries, wants to buy.
  • He who demands does not command.
  • He who does as he likes has no headache.
  • He who does not when he can, cannot when he will.
  • He who does the wrong forgets it, but not he who receives it.
  • He who doth his own business defileth not his fingers.
  • He who doth the injury never forgives the injured man.
  • He who eats pears with his master should not choose the best.
  • He who enjoys good health is rich, though he knows it not.
  • He who esteems none but himself is as happy as a king.
  • He who excuses, accuses himself.
  • He who fails to plan, plans to fail.
  • He who gives bread to others' dogs is often barked at by his own.
  • He who gives fair words feeds you with an empty spoon.
  • He who goes to the mill gets befloured.
  • He who grasps too much holds nothing fast.
  • He who guesses well prophesies well.
  • He who has a bad name is half hanged.
  • He who has a bad tongue should have good loins.
  • He who has a good horse in his stable may go on foot.
  • He who has a head won't want for a hat.
  • He who has a mate has a master.
  • He who has a mind to beat a dog will easily find a stick.
  • He who has a straw tail is always in fear of its catching fire.
  • He who has a tongue, may go to Rome.
  • He who has been stung by a serpent is afraid of a lizard.
  • He who has crossed the ford knows how deep it is.
  • He who has land has war.
  • He who has loaves has dogs.
  • He who has money to throw away, let him employ workmen, and not stand by.
  • He who has scalded himself once blows the next time.
  • He who has teeth has no bread, and he who has bread has no teeth.
  • He who hath an ill name is half hanged.
  • He who hunts two hares does not catch the one and lets the other escape.
  • He who in under cover when it rains is a great fool if he stirs.
  • He who is an ass and thinks himself a stag, finds his mistake when he comes to leap the ditch.
  • He who is embarked with the devil must make the passage in his company.
  • He who is guilty believes that all men speak ill of him.
  • He who is in hell knows not what heaven is.
  • He who is meant to be a basket-carrier is born with the handle in his hand.
  • He who is not impatient is not in love.
  • He who is of the craft can discourse about it.
  • He who is the cause of his own misfortune may bewail it himself.
  • He who is the offender is never the forgiver.
  • He who is unable is always willing.
  • He who is without debt is without credit.
  • He who knows but little quickly tells it.
  • He who knows little quickly tells it.
  • He who knows nothing doubts nothing.
  • He who knows nothing knows enough, if he knows how to be silent.
  • He who knows nothing never doubts.
  • He who knows the road can ride full trot.
  • He who laughs overmuch may have an aching heart.
  • He who lets the goat be laid on his shoulders is soon after forced to carry the cow.
  • He who likes drinking is always talking of wine.
  • He who lives among wolves learns to howl.
  • He who looks on has two-thirds of the game.
  • He who loses is always in fault.
  • He who makes himself a dove is eaten by the hawk.
  • He who makes himself a servant is expected to remain a servant.
  • He who praises himself befouls himself.
  • He who risks nothing can gain nothing.
  • He who says nothing never lies.
  • He who serves the public has a sorry master.
  • He who serves two masters must lie to one of them.
  • He who sings drives away sorrow.
  • He who sleeps catches no fish.
  • He who sleeps well does not feel the fleas.
  • He who succeeds is reputed wise.
  • He who sups with the Devil should have a long spoon.
  • He who sups with the devil must have a long spoon.
  • He who suspects is seldom at fault.
  • He who swears is a liar.
  • He who sweats more in peace, bleeds less in war.
  • He who tells his own affairs will hardly keep secret those of others.
  • He who throws away money with his hands will seek it with his feet.
  • He who touches pitch defiles himself.
  • He who wants his dog killed has only to say he's mad.
  • He who wants milk should not sit in the middle of a field and wait for a cow to back up to him.
  • He who will not serve one master must needs serve many.
  • He who would be long an old man must begin betimes.
  • He who would be rich in a year gets hanged in six months.
  • He who would enjoy the feast should fast on the eve.
  • He who would have clear water should go to the fountain head.
  • He who would relish his food must not see it cooked.
  • He who would rest must work.
  • He who would stop every man's mouth must have a great deal of meal.
  • He would be a good one to send for death.
  • He would break his neck against a straw.
  • He would drown in a spoonful of water.
  • He would not give the devil a knife to cut his throat.
  • He would sell even his share of the sun.
  • He would skin a flint.
  • He would slaughter a bug to drink its blood.
  • He's a friend at sneezing-time - the most that can be got from him is a "God bless you."
  • He's a wise man that leads passion by the bridle.
  • He's an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.
  • Health without money is a half-malady.
  • Hear the other side, and believe little.
  • Hedges have no eyes, but they have ears.
  • Hell and Chancery are always open.
  • Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.
  • Hell is crowded with ungrateful wretches.
  • Hide not the truth from your confessor, your doctor, or your lawyer.
  • High birth is a poor dish on the table.
  • Home, dear home, small as thou art, to me thou art a palace.
  • Homer sometimes nods.
  • Honest men marry soon, wise men never.
  • Hour by hour time departs.
  • How can the cat help it if the maid be a fool?
  • Hunger transmutes beans into almonds.
  • I being satisfied, the world is satisfied.
  • I saw you at Lucca, I knew you at Pisa.
  • I speak to you, daughter; hear it daughter-in-law.
  • I too can lead the geese to water when it rains.
  • I will do what I can, and a little less, to be able to continue at it.
  • If I have lost the ring I still have the fingers.
  • If I sleep, I sleep for myself; if I work, I know not for whom.
  • If I went to sea I should find it dry.
  • If it rained maccaroni, what a fine time for gluttons!
  • If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, looks like a duck, it must be a duck.
  • If it were not for hope, the heart would break.
  • If it were not for the belly, the back might wear gold.
  • If it's not one thing, it's another.
  • If pride were an art, how many doctors we should have.
  • If someone betrays you once, it's his fault. If he betrays you twice, it's your fault.
  • If the hen had not cackled, we should not know she had laid an egg.
  • If the hours are long enough and the pay is short enough, someone will say it's women's work.
  • If the sun shines on me I care not for the moon.
  • If the wife sins the husband is not innocent.
  • If the young man knew, if the old man could, there is nothing but would be done.
  • If you are a mouse don't follow frogs.
  • If you let them put the calf on your shoulders, it will not be long before they clap on the cow.
  • If you scatter thorns, don't go barefoot.
  • If you would have your work ill done, pay beforehand.
  • If you would succeed, you must not be too good.
  • If young men had wit and old men strength everything might be well done.
  • Ill in kine and worse in beeves.
  • Ill luck comes by pounds and goes away by ounces.
  • Ill news comes apace.
  • Ill news travels fast.
  • Illness tells us what we are.
  • Imagination gallops, judgment merely walks.
  • In a golden sheath a leaden knife.
  • In men every mortal sin is venial, in women every venial sin is mortal.
  • In prosperity no altars smoke.
  • In the country of the blind blessed is he that hath one eye.
  • In the country of the blind the one eyed man is king.
  • In the fray the weak are strong.
  • In the war of love who flies conquers.
  • In war time there is pay for every horse.
  • Injurious is the gift that takes away freedom.
  • Injury is to be measured by malice.
  • It is a bad game where nobody wins.
  • It is a bad thing to be a knave, but worse to be known for one.
  • It is a bad thing to be poor, and seem poor.
  • It is a good answer which knows when to stop.
  • It is a good file that cuts iron without making a noise.
  • It is a good horse that never stumbles, And a good wife that never grumbles.
  • It is a sorry house where the hens crow and the cock is silent.
  • It is all one whether you die of sickness or of love.
  • It is always good to have two strings to your bow.
  • It is better to have a husband without love than jealous.
  • It is better to hear the nightingale sing than the mouse gnaw.
  • It is better to irritate a dog than an old woman.
  • It is better to leave than to lack.
  • It is easy robbing when the dog is quieted.
  • It is easy to give advice when all goes well.
  • It is easy to preach fasting with a fully belly.
  • It is easy to threaten a bull from a window.
  • It is good living under the shadow of the belfry.
  • It is good to buy when another wants to sell.
  • It is good to have friends everywhere.
  • It is good to hold the clothes of one who is swimming.
  • It is in vain to lay a net in sight of the birds.
  • It is no time to play chess when the house is on fire.
  • It is no use crying over spilt milk.
  • It is not easy to show the way to a blind man.
  • It is not easy to steal in thieves' houses.
  • It is not enough to know how to steal, one must know also how to conceal.
  • It is not every flower that smells sweet.
  • It is not honour for an eagle to vanquish a dove.
  • It is not necessary to fish up every bucket that falls into the well.
  • It is not spring until you can plant your foot upon twelve daisies.
  • It is not the long day, but the heart that does the work.
  • It is the blood of the soldier that makes the general great.
  • It is the petty expenses that empty the purse.
  • It is too late to come with water when the house is burnt down.
  • It is truth that makes a many angry.
  • It is vain to fish if the hook is not baited.
  • It never thunders but it rains.
  • It takes four living men to carry one dead man out of a house.
  • It's a bad mouthful that chokes.
  • It's a free country.
  • It's a very proud horse that will not carry his oats.
  • It's foolish sheep that makes the wolf its confessor.
  • Keep yourself from opportunities and God will keep you from sins.
  • Keeping from falling is better then helping up.
  • Kin or no kin, woe to him who has nothing.
  • Large trees give more shade than fruit.
  • Lasses and glasses are always in danger.
  • Laughter makes good blood.
  • Laws were made for rogues.
  • Lawyers' robes are lined with the obstinacy of suitors.
  • Lay it on thick and some of it will stick.
  • Lay on more wood; ashes give money.
  • Leave no nail unclenched.
  • Lent, which seems so long, is short at other men's tables.
  • Let every fox take care of his own tail.
  • Let every one keep off the flies with his own tail.
  • Let him not be a lover who has not courage.
  • Let him who is well off stay where he is.
  • Let not you shirt know your secret.
  • Let not your shirt know all your thoughts.
  • Let the injurer not forget.
  • Let us first catch the bear and then sell its skin.
  • Let us have florins and we shall find cousins.
  • Let well alone.
  • Like lips, like lettuce.
  • Like saint like offering.
  • Like well like bucket.
  • Like will to like, as the devil said to the collier.
  • Lip courtesy pleases much and costs little.
  • Little children and headaches, great children and heartaches.
  • Live and learn.
  • Look before you leap.
  • Look for the hog at the oak.
  • Look high and fall low.
  • Look with suspicion on the flight of an enemy.
  • Lookers-on see most of the game.
  • Love demands faith, and faith firmness.
  • Love is an excuse for its own faults.
  • Love is blind but sees afar.
  • Love is master of all arts.
  • Love is the true price at which love is bought.
  • Love knows not labour.
  • Love levels all inequalities.
  • Love rules his kingdom without a sword.
  • Love rules without law.
  • Love rules without rules. [Amore regge senza legge.]
  • Love your friend with his faults.
  • Love's merchandise is jealousy and broken faith.
  • Love, a cough, and smoke, are hard to hide.
  • Lovers think others are blind.
  • Lovers' purses are tied with cobwebs.
  • Make me a prophet and I will make you rich.
  • Many a one leaves the roast who afterwards longs for the smoke of it.
  • Many a one threatens and yet is afraid.
  • Many a true word in spoken in jest.
  • Many are brave when the enemy flies.
  • Many are called but few are chosen.
  • Many desire the tree who pretend to refuse the fruit.
  • Many return from the war who cannot give an account of the battle.
  • Many scruple to spit in church, and afterwards defile the altar.
  • Many stop their noses at ambergris.
  • Marriages are not as they are made, but as they turn out.
  • Masters' hints are commands.
  • Measure three times and cut once.
  • Men after the modern fashion, and asses after the ancient.
  • Men are as old as they fell, and women as they look.
  • Men make wealth, and women preserve it.
  • Money and friendship break the arms of justice.
  • Money is an epitome of human power.
  • Money is money's brother.
  • Money is round, and rolls.
  • More unlucky than dogs in church.
  • Mother-in-law and daughter-in-law, storm and hail.
  • Mouth shut and eyes open.
  • Much smoke, and little roast.
  • Much water passes by the mill that the miller perceives not.
  • Muddy water won't do for a mirror.
  • My No is as good as your Yes.
  • Near is my petticoat but nearer is my smock.
  • Near is my shirt, but nearer is my skin.
  • Near the church far from God.
  • Necessity and opportunity may make a coward valiant.
  • Necessity becomes will.
  • Neither women nor linen by candlelight.
  • Never do evil that good may come of it.
  • Never heed the colour of a gift horse.
  • Never is a long time.
  • Never judge a book by its cover.
  • Never let the bottom of your purse or of your mind be seen.
  • Never let the sun go down on your anger.
  • Never spur a willing horse.
  • Never was a mewing cat a good mouser.
  • No comforter's head ever aches.
  • No day but has its evening.
  • No day in which you learn something is a complete loss.
  • No good doctor ever takes physic.
  • No good lawyer ever goes to law himself.
  • No good thing is failure and no evil thing success.
  • No meat ever remains in the shambles however bad it may be.
  • No need to say "trot" to a good horse.
  • No one ever became poor through giving alms.
  • No one ever kicks a dead dog.
  • No one ever repented of having held his tongue.
  • No one likes justice brought home to his own door.
  • No one perceives where the shoe pinches but he who wears it.
  • No one should take in an eating pawn (or pledge).
  • No pear falls into a shut mouth.
  • No sooner is the law made than its evasion is discovered.
  • No wonder lasts more than three days.
  • Not all are asleep who have their eyes shut.
  • Not all that shakes falls.
  • Not all words require an answer.
  • Not every word requires an answer.
  • Not everything that is bad comes to hurt us.
  • Not everything which is bad comes to hurt us.
  • Not having enough is like not having anything.
  • Nothing can come out of a sack but what is in it.
  • Nothing is difficult to a willing mind.
  • Nothing is ever well done in a hurry, except flying from the plague or from quarrels, and catching fleas.
  • Nothing is ill said if it is not ill taken.
  • Nothing passes between asses but kicks.
  • Of judgment every one has a stock on hand for sale.
  • Of the great and of the dead either speak will or say nothing.
  • Of this world each man has as much as he takes.
  • Of three things the devil makes a salad: advocate's tongues, notaries' fingers, and a third that shall be nameless.
  • Of two cowards, the one who finds the other out first has the advantage.
  • Of two evils choose the less.
  • Of what does not concern you say nothing, good or bad.
  • Old birds are not caught with new nets.
  • Old reckonings, new disputes.
  • Old thanks are not for new gifts.
  • On a long journey even a straw is heavy.
  • On every small pretext the wolf seizes the sheep.
  • Once resolved, the trouble is over.
  • One basket of grapes does not make a vintage.
  • One bell serves a parish.
  • One bird in hand is better far Than two that in the bushes are.
  • One briar does not make a hedge.
  • One can't enter Paradise in spite of the saints.
  • One cannot drink and whistle at the same time.
  • One daughter helps to marry the other.
  • One devil does not make hell.
  • One devil drives out another.
  • One devil knows another.
  • One door never shuts but another opens.
  • One enemy is too many, and a hundred friends are too few.
  • One eye of the master sees more than four eyes of his servants.
  • One flea does not hinder sleep.
  • One fool is enough in a house.
  • One good morsel and a hundred vexations.
  • One good word quenches more heat than a bucket of water.
  • One is never too old to yearn.
  • One knife keeps another in its sheath.
  • One lie draw ten after it.
  • One lie makes many.
  • One living pope is better than ten dead.
  • One may have good eyes and see nothing.
  • One never wept but another laughed.
  • One pair of ears would exhaust a hundred tongues.
  • One scabby sheep spoils a flock.
  • One should learn to sail in all winds.
  • One starts the hare, another catches it.
  • One who speaks fair words feeds you with an empty spoon.
  • One who walks in another's tracks leaves no footprints.
  • One who wants to keep their yard tidy does not reserve a plot for the weeds.
  • One with the courage to laugh is master of the world almost as much as the person ready to die.
  • One word brings on another.
  • One would not be alone in Paradise.
  • One's own spurs and another's horse make the miles short.
  • Open thy mouth that I may know thee.
  • Others' bread has seven crusts.
  • Others' bread is too salt.
  • Out of a great evil often comes a great good.
  • Out of a white egg often comes a black chick.
  • Out of debt, out of danger.
  • Paper does not blush.
  • Patience! said the wolf to the ass.
  • Pay beforehand was never well served.
  • Peel a fig for your friend, a peach for your enemy.
  • Penny and penny laid up will be many.
  • Plenty makes daintiness.
  • Plenty of words when the cause is lost.
  • Pluck the magpie, and don't make her scream.
  • Pluck the rose and leave the thorns.
  • Poison quells poison.
  • Poor men do penance for rich men's sins.
  • Poor men's money and cowards' weapons are often flourished.
  • Poverty has no kin.
  • Pride went out on horseback, and returned on foot.
  • Priests, friars, nuns, and chickens never have enough.
  • Princes have long arms.
  • Proverbs bear age, and he who would do well may view himself in them as in a looking glass.
  • Public money is like holy water, every one helps himself to it.
  • Quick and well don't agree.
  • Rather an ass that carries than a horse that throws.
  • Rather hat in hand than hand in purse.
  • Rather have a little one for your friend, than a great one for your enemy.
  • Reason lies between bridle and spur.
  • Reconciled friendship is a wound ill salved.
  • Revenge a hundred years old has still its milk-teeth.
  • Running water carries no poison.
  • Save a thief from the gallows and he'll be the first who shall cut your throat.
  • Save something for the man that rides on the white horse.
  • Save us from our friends.
  • Savings are the first gain.
  • Say what we will, do what we will, the boat goes but sorrily without oars.
  • Saying is one thing, doing another.
  • Second thoughts are best.
  • Secrecy is the beginning of tyranny.
  • See Naples and then die.
  • See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.
  • Seeing is believing.
  • Seldom seen soon forgotten.
  • Self exaltation is the fool's paradise.
  • Sell me dear, and measure me fair.
  • Sell not the bear's skin before you have caught him.
  • Service is not inheritance.
  • She who is born a beauty is born betrothed.
  • Silence was never written down.
  • Since the house is on fire I will warm myself at the blaze.
  • Six feet of earth make us all equal.
  • Six hours sleep for a man, seven for a woman, and eight for a fool.
  • Six of one, and half a dozen of the other.
  • Skill or fortune will efface the spots.
  • Small rain lays a great wind.
  • Small rain lays great dust.
  • Smooth words do not flay the tongue.
  • Smooth words make smooth ways.
  • Snapping curs never want sore ears.
  • So good that he is good for nothing.
  • Softly, barber, the water scalds.
  • Softly, don't raise a dust.
  • Softly, softly, catchee monkey.
  • Some many heads, so many brains.
  • Some sing who are not merry.
  • Some who just tell tales of themselves.
  • Sometimes an egg is given for an ox.
  • Sometimes it is better to give your apple away, than to eat it yourself.
  • Sometimes the lees are better than the wine.
  • Soon crooks the tree That good gambrel would be.
  • Speak of the devil and he appears.
  • Speak well of your friend; of your enemy neither well nor ill.
  • Speak when you are spoken to.
  • St. Francis shaved himself first, and then he shaved his brethren.
  • Starlings are lean because they go in flocks.
  • Step by step one goes to Rome.
  • Still water breeds vermin.
  • Stones or bread, one must have something in hand for the dogs.
  • Strength avails not a coward.
  • Stretch your arm no further than your sleeve will reach.
  • Strong is the vinegar of sweet wine.
  • Sweet meat requires sour sauce.
  • Take care you don't let your tail be caught in the door.
  • Take down a thief from the gallows and he will hang you up.
  • Teeth placed before the tongue give good advice.
  • Tell everybody your business and the devil will do it for you.
  • Tell everybody your business and they will do it for you.
  • Tell your secret to your friend and he will set his foot on your neck.
  • Temperance is the best medicine.
  • Tempest in a teapot.
  • Thank you, pretty pussy, was the death of my cat.
  • That costs dear which is bought with begging.
  • That happens in a moment which may not happen in a hundred years.
  • That is pleasant to remember which was hard to endure.
  • That priest is a fool who decries his relics.
  • That suit is best that best fits me.
  • That that comes of a cat will catch mice.
  • That which is customary requires no excuse.
  • The Italianised Englishman is a devil incarnate.
  • The Italians are wise before the act, the Germans in the act, the French after the act.
  • The Trojans were wise too late.
  • The anvil lasts longer than the hammer.
  • The applause of the people is a blast of air.
  • The apple does not fall far from the tree.
  • The ass does not know the worth of this tail till he has lost it.
  • The ass's hide is used to the stick.
  • The back door is the one that robs the home.
  • The back door robbeth the house.
  • The beard does not make the philosopher.
  • The beast once dead, the venom is dead.
  • The beggar's wallet has no bottom.
  • The best always goes first.
  • The best armor is to keep out of range.
  • The best pears fall into the pigs' mouths.
  • The best physicians are Dr. Diet, Dr. Quiet, and Dr. Merryman.
  • The best spices are in small bags.
  • The best swimmer is the first to drown himself.
  • The best trees are the most beaten.
  • The big fish eat the little.
  • The biter is sometimes bit.
  • The braying of an ass does not reach heaven.
  • The bucket goes so often to the well that it leaves its handle there.
  • The buckets take to fighting with the well, and get their heads broken.
  • The cask can give no other wine that that it contains.
  • The chamber-bell (chamber-clapper, or curtain lecture) is the worst sound one have in his ears.
  • The cock is bold on his own dunghill.
  • The common soldier's blood makes the general great.
  • The company makes the feast.
  • The court of Rome likes not sheep without wool.
  • The danger past, the saint cheated.
  • The darkest hour is just before dawn.
  • The devil is bad because he is old.
  • The devil will tempt Lucifer.
  • The difficult thing is to get foot in the stirrup.
  • The doctor seldom takes physic.
  • The dog barks and the ox feeds.
  • The dog that bites does not bark in vain.
  • The dog that has been beaten with a stick is afraid of its shadow.
  • The dog that is quarrelsome and not strong, woe to his hide.
  • The dog that licks ashes is not to be trusted with flour.
  • The dog that means to bite don't bark.
  • The dog that quits barking can get some sleep.
  • The eagle does not war against frogs.
  • The earth covers the errors of the physician.
  • The election of the abbot is not stopped for want of a monk.
  • The elephant does not feel a flea-bite.
  • The end of the corsair is to drown.
  • The end praises the work.
  • The eye is blind if the mind is absent.
  • The eye of the master fattens the horse.
  • The fear of war is worse than war itself.
  • The first at the mill grinds first.
  • The first dish pleases every one.
  • The flatterer's throat is an open sepulchre.
  • The fly that bites the tortoise breaks its beak.
  • The fool knows more in his own house than the sage in other men's.
  • The fortress that parleys soon surrenders.
  • The fox advised the others to cut off their tails, because he had left his own in the trap.
  • The fox said the grapes were sour.
  • The friendship of the great is fraternity with lions.
  • The frog cannot out of her bog.
  • The fugitive finds everything impede him.
  • The full belly does not believe in hunger.
  • The full cask makes no noise.
  • The gardener's dog does not eat lettuce and will not let others eat it.
  • The golden key opens every door.
  • The good seaman is known in bad weather.
  • The good shepherd shears, not flays.
  • The good time comes but once.
  • The gown does not make the friar.
  • The hardest step is that over the threshold.
  • The healthy die first.
  • The heart does not think all the mouth says.
  • The house completed, possession defeated.
  • The injurer never forgets.
  • The just man may sin with an open chest of gold before him.
  • The kick of a mare never hurt a colt.
  • The last comer shuts the door.
  • The later comer is ill lodged.
  • The lazy pig does not eat ripe pears.
  • The liar is not believed when he speaks the truth.
  • The light is painful to sore eyes.
  • The lion and the lamb shall lie down together, but the lamb won't get much sleep.
  • The lion had need of the mouse.
  • The lion is known by his claws.
  • The lives of doctors, the souls of priests, and the property of lawyers, are in great danger.
  • The longest way round is the shortest way home.
  • The loquacity of fools is a lecture to the wise.
  • The man who lives only by hope will die with despair.
  • The man who loves is easy of belief.
  • The man who never makes a mistake always takes orders from one who does.
  • The mill does not grind without water.
  • The moon does not heed the baying of dogs.
  • The more the fox is cursed, the more prey he catches.
  • The more the merrier.
  • The more you stroke the cat's back the more set sets up her tail.
  • The most prudent yields to the strongest.
  • The moth does most mischief to the finest garment.
  • The mountains are in labour, and bring forth a mouse.
  • The myrtle is always a myrtle, though it be among nettles.
  • The pan says to the pot: Keep off, or you'll smutch me.
  • The pitcher that goes often to the fountain leaves there either its handle or its spout.
  • The point of the thorn is small, but hw who has felt it does not forget it.
  • The poison of asps is under their lips.
  • The poor is hated by his neighbour, but the rich hath many friends.
  • The pope and a peasant know more than the pope together.
  • The priest errs at the altar.
  • The rich never have to seek out their relatives.
  • The right hand is slave to the left.
  • The right man comes at the right time.
  • The river does not swell with clear water.
  • The river passed the saint forgotten.
  • The roses fall, and the thorns remain.
  • The roses fall, the thorns remain.
  • The rotten apple injures its neighbour.
  • The saint has no believers unless he works miracles.
  • The same fire purifies gold and consumes straw.
  • The same fire which purifies gold consumes straw.
  • The same hammer that breaks the glass forges the steel.
  • The scalded dog fears cold water.
  • The scalded dog fears hot water, and afterwards, cold.
  • The shadow of a lord is a cap for a fool.
  • The she-bear thinks her cubs pretty.
  • The ship does not go without the boat.
  • The shirt is nearer than the doublet.
  • The sick man is free to say all.
  • The sick man sleeps when the debtor cannot.
  • The smoke of my own house is better than another man's fire.
  • The soldier is well paid for doing mischief.
  • The soldier's blood exalts the captain.
  • The sound of the bell does not drive away rooks.
  • The stitch is lost unless the thread be knotted.
  • The strongest is always in the right.
  • The sun is still beautiful, though ready to set.
  • The sun loses nothing by shining into a puddle.
  • The sun passes over filth and is not defiled.
  • The tail is always the hardest part to flay.
  • The talkers sows, the listener reaps.
  • The tender surgeon makes the wound gangrene.
  • The thief is frightened even by a mouse.
  • The thief's wife does not always laugh.
  • The tree is not felled at one blow.
  • The tree is not to be judged of by its bark.
  • The unfortunate know who are their real friends.
  • The venom is in the tail.
  • The virtue of parents is in itself a great legacy.
  • The virtue of silence is a great piece of knowledge.
  • The water breaks out where it is not expected.
  • The well-fed man does not believe in hunger.
  • The white coat does not make the miller.
  • The whole hog or none.
  • The whole ocean is made up of single drops.
  • The wicked even hate vice in others.
  • The wolf bemoans the sheep, and then eats it.
  • The wolf is always left out of the reckoning.
  • The wolf is always said to be bigger than he is.
  • The wolf is always said to be more terrible than he is.
  • The wolf is not always a wolf.
  • The woman who gives is seldom good; the woman who accepts is in the power of the giver.
  • The world belongs to the phlegmatic.
  • The world is for him who has patience.
  • The world is governed with little brains.
  • The world is like a staircase; some go up, others go down.
  • The world wags on with three things: doing, undoing, and pretending.
  • The worst pig gets the best pear.
  • The worst pig often gets the best pear.
  • The wrong-doer never lacks excuses.
  • There are good and bad everywhere.
  • There are many roads to Rome.
  • There are more asses than carry sacks.
  • There are more thieves than gibbets.
  • There are more threatened than slain.
  • There are more ways to the wood than one.
  • There are no birds in last year's nest.
  • There are some who despise pride with a greater pride.
  • There are some who see ill, and would like to see worse.
  • There are tricks in all trades.
  • There are tricks in every trade.
  • There goes more than one ass to market.
  • There goes more to marriage than four bare legs in a bed.
  • There is a cause for all things.
  • There is little peace in that house where the hen crows and the cock is mute.
  • There is never a cry of "Wolf!" but the wolf is in the district.
  • There is never enmity between the cook and the butler.
  • There is never enough where nought is left.
  • There is no appeal from time past.
  • There is no beard so well shaven but another barber will find something more to shave from it.
  • There is no dog, be he ever so wicked, but wags his tail.
  • There is no fool like a learned fool.
  • There is no getting blood from a turnip.
  • There is no helping him who will not be advised.
  • There is no making pancakes without breaking the eggs.
  • There is no need to bind up one's head before it is broken.
  • There is no use in saying, I will not go such a way, nor drink of such a water.
  • There is no worse fruit than that which never ripens.
  • There is no worse robber than a bad book.
  • There is no worse thief than a bad book.
  • There never was a shoe however handsome that did not become an ugly slipper.
  • There's no disputing about tastes.
  • There's no getting to heaven in a coach.
  • There's no great loss without some gain.
  • There's no making the ass drink when his is not thirsty.
  • There's no smoke with fire.
  • There's no thief like a bad book.
  • There's no turning a windmill with a pair of bellows.
  • There's none so blind as those who will not see.
  • They say, is a liar.
  • They who shun the smoke often fall into the fire.
  • They who sing through the summer must dance in the winter.
  • Thick wine is better than clear water.
  • Things are not as they are, but as they are regarded.
  • Think much, speak little and write less.
  • Thirst comes from drinking.
  • Those who sleep with dogs will rise with fleas.
  • Though a lie be swift, truth overtakes it.
  • Though the fox runs, the pullets have wings.
  • Threats are arms for the threatened.
  • Three know it, all know it.
  • Three may keep a secret, if two of them are dead.
  • Three things drive a man out of doors: smoke, dropping water, and a shrew.
  • Through being too knowing the fox lost his tail.
  • Tie me hand and foot and throw me among my own people.
  • Tied to the sowre apple-tree.
  • Time is an inaudible file.
  • To a crazy ship every wind is contrary.
  • To a quick question give a slow answer.
  • To a young heart everything is sport.
  • To become rich in this world, it needs only to turn one's back on God.
  • To censure princes is perilous, and to praise them is lying.
  • To every saint his torch.
  • To expect what never comes, to lie in bed and not sleep, to serve well and not be advanced, are three things to die of.
  • To fall out of the frying-pan into the fire.
  • To have "Heard say" is half a lie.
  • To have eye one on the cat and another on the frying-pan.
  • To have luck needs little wit.
  • To him who can take what thou hast, give what he asks.
  • To him who gives you a pig you may well give a rasher.
  • To him who is determined it remains only to act.
  • To him who watches, everything reveals itself.
  • To know everything is to know nothing.
  • To make the cart go you must grease the wheels.
  • To preserve friendship one must build walls.
  • To promise and give nothing is comfort for a fool.
  • To protest and knock one's head against the wall is what everybody can do.
  • To the fallen tree, hatchets! hatchets!
  • To whom you tell your secret you surrender your freedom.
  • Translators, traitors.
  • Travel broadens the mind.
  • True love never grows old.
  • Trust was a good man; Trust-not was a better.
  • Two cocks in one yard do not agree.
  • Two dogs fight for a bone and a third runs away with it.
  • Two women and a goose make a market.
  • Unbending the bow does not cure the wound.
  • Unbending the bow does not heal the wound.
  • Under white ashes there is glowing coal.
  • Until death there is no knowing what may befal.
  • Various are the roads to fame.
  • Vengeance is mine, saith the Lord.
  • Vetches seem bitter to the full-cropped pigeon.
  • Vexations, duly borne, Are but as trials, which heaven's love to man Sends for his good.
  • Wait time and place to take your revenge, for it is never well done in a hurry.
  • War begun, hell unchained.
  • Water after does not quench a fire at hand.
  • Water, smoke, and a vicious woman, drive men out of the house.
  • We learn by teaching.
  • Wealth conquered Rome after Rome had conquered the world.
  • Wealth is not his who makes it, but his who enjoys it.
  • What costs little is little esteemed.
  • What does not poison, fattens.
  • What has not been, may be.
  • What keeps out the cold keeps out the heat.
  • What will be, will be.
  • What you can't have, abuse.
  • When I'm dead, everybody's dead, and the pig too.
  • When a dog runs away, hit him! hit him!
  • When a man has fallen into the mire, the more he flounders the more he fouls himself.
  • When a tree is falling, every one cries, down with it.
  • When everybody says you are drunk, go to sleep.
  • When fortune comes, open your doors.
  • When gold speaks every tongue is silent.
  • When good cheer is lacking, our friends will be packing.
  • When his head is broken he puts on his helmet.
  • When house and land are gone and spent, then learning is most excellent.
  • When ill-luck falls asleep let nobody wake her.
  • When it thunders, the thief becomes honest.
  • When rogues go in procession the devil carries the cross.
  • When the cat's away the mice dance.
  • When the cat's away the rats dance.
  • When the devil is old he turns hermit.
  • When the fox preaches, take care of yourselves, hens.
  • When the lion is dead the hares jump upon his carcase.
  • When the lion's skin falls short, piece it out with that of the fox.
  • When the millers are making an uproar, do you tie up your sacks.
  • When the ship has sunk everyone knows how she might have been saved.
  • When the sun shines on thee, thou needest not care for the moon.
  • When the tree is down every one runs to it with a hatchet to cut wood.
  • When the will is prompt the legs are nimble.
  • When the wind is in the east, 'tis neither good for man nor beast.
  • When the wind serves, all aid.
  • When the wine's in the wit's out.
  • When there is a fire in the neighbourhood carry water to your own house.
  • When there is little bread at table put plenty on your plate.
  • When there is nothing the church loses.
  • When wine enters modesty departs.
  • When wine sinks, words swim.
  • When wise men play mad pranks they do it with a vengeance.
  • When woman reigns the devil governs.
  • When you see the wolf, do not look for his track.
  • When your devil was born, mine was going to school.
  • Where love is there the eye is.
  • Where remedies are needed, sighing avails not.
  • Where shall a man have a worse friend than he brings from home.
  • Where the Pope is there is Rome.
  • Where the devil cannot put his head he puts his tail.
  • Where the hedge is low every one will cross it.
  • Where the pupil is willing; the teachers will appear.
  • Where the ship goes the brig can go.
  • Where the skin of the lion does not suffice, we must join that of the fox.
  • Where there are no dogs the fox is a king.
  • Where there are too many cooks the soup will be too salty.
  • Where there is equality there never can be perfect love.
  • Where there is great love there is great pain.
  • Where there is least heart there is most tongue.
  • While there's life there's hope.
  • While two dogs are fighting for a bone, a third runs away with it.
  • Who accepts, sells himself.
  • Who builds on the mob builds on sand.
  • Who builds upon the people, builds upon sand.
  • Who buys hath need of eyes.
  • Who buys land buys war.
  • Who cannot beat the horse let him beat the saddle.
  • Who changes country changes luck.
  • Who changes his condition changes fortune.
  • Who comes seldom, is welcome.
  • Who dangles after the great is the last at table and the first to be cuffed.
  • Who depends on another man's table often dines late.
  • Who divides honey with the bear, will be like to get the lesser share..
  • Who does all he may never does well.
  • Who does not wish to be like the wolf let him not wear its skin.
  • Who does too much, often does little.
  • Who errs in the tens errs in the thousands.
  • Who excuses himself accuses himself.
  • Who excuses himself without being accused makes his fault manifest.
  • Who frequents the kitchen smells of smoke.
  • Who gives sell, sells dear, if the receiver be not a churl.
  • Who gives, teaches a return.
  • Who glows not burns not.
  • Who goes himself is in earnest, who sends is indifferent.
  • Who goes not, sees not; who proves not, believes not.
  • Who goes softly goes safely, and he that goes safely goes far.
  • Who has a tongue in his head can go all the world over.
  • Who has love in his heart has spurs in his sides.
  • Who has never done thinking never begins doing.
  • Who has no children does not know what love is.
  • Who has no head should have legs.
  • Who has no money in his purse must have honey in his mouth.
  • Who has no money must have no wishes.
  • Who has no plagues makes himself some.
  • Who has no shame all the world is his own.
  • Who has not is not.
  • Who has nothing is nothing.
  • Who has patience may get fat thrushes at a farthing apiece.
  • Who has patience sees his revenge.
  • Who has something is something.
  • Who has, is.
  • Who hath little shame the world is all his own.
  • Who hath no courage must have legs.
  • Who is born a fool is never cured.
  • Who is in fear of every leaf must not go into the wood.
  • Who is in the right fears, who is in the wrong hopes.
  • Who judges others, condemns himself.
  • Who keeps company with a wolf will learn to howl.
  • Who knows most, forgives most.
  • Who knows most, knows least.
  • Who knows not how to dissemble knows not how to reign.
  • Who knows not how to flatter knows not how to talk.
  • Who knows not how to pray let him go sail the sea.
  • Who knows not the game, let him not play.
  • Who laughs at others' ills, has his own behind the door.
  • Who lies down with dogs gets up with fleas.
  • Who loves the tree loves the branch.
  • Who loves to roam may lose his home.
  • Who loves, believes.
  • Who loves, fears.
  • Who makes the wolf his companion should carry a dog under his cloak.
  • Who more busy than they who have least to do?
  • Who moves, picks up, who stands still, dries up.
  • Who offends writes on sand; who is offended, on marble.
  • Who paints me before blackens me behind.
  • Who pays a debt creates capital.
  • Who pays beforehand is served behindhand.
  • Who saves, saves for the cat.
  • Who says A must say B.
  • Who serves the public, serves no one.
  • Who serves well and says nothing makes claim enough.
  • Who sows ill reaps ill.
  • Who takes a lion at a distance fears a mole present.
  • Who takes an eel by the tail and a woman at her word, may say he holds nothing.
  • Who throws a stone at the sky, it falls back on his head.
  • Who troubles others has no rest himself.
  • Who wishes for a short Lent let him contract debts to be paid at Easter.
  • Who would have many friends let him test but few.
  • Who would not have feet set on his neck, let him not stoop.
  • Whoever brings finds the door open for him.
  • Willows are weak, yet serve to bind bigger wood.
  • Wise lads and old fools were never good for anything.
  • Wise men change their minds, fools never.
  • Wise men learn by other men's mistakes, fools by their own.
  • With art and knavery we live through half the year; with knavery and art we live through the other.
  • With the Gospel men may become heretics.
  • With the fox one must play the fox.
  • With the skin of the dog its bite is cured.
  • With wishing comes grieving.
  • Without debt without care.
  • Wolves don't eat wolves.
  • Wolves have howled at the moon for centuries, yet it is still there.
  • Woman (decides), impromptu; man, on reflection.
  • Women always speak the truth, but not the whole truth.
  • Women and hens are lost by too much gadding.
  • Women are wise impromptu, fools on reflection.
  • Women know a point more than the devil.
  • Women naturally deceive, weep and spin.
  • Women rouge that they may not blush.
  • Women's tears are a fountain of craft.
  • Women, asses, and nuts, require strong hands.
  • Women, priests, and poultry, never have enough.
  • Words are female, deeds are male.
  • Words are for women, actions for men.
  • Words won't feet cats.
  • Years and sins are always more than owned.
  • Years know more than books.
  • Yielding is sometimes the best way of succeeding.
  • You cannot damage a wrecked whip.
  • You cannot discover new oceans unless you have the courage to lose sight of the shore.
  • You cannot draw blood from a turnip.
  • You have married a beauty? So much the worse for you.
  • You have nobody to blame but yourself if you stumble more than once over the same stump.
  • You must grease the wheels if you would have the car run.
  • You must shift your sail with the wind.
  • You must take the fat with the lean.
  • You will not be loved if you think of yourself alone.
  • Your enemy makes you wiser.

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