German Proverbs

  • 'Tis easier to hurt than heal.
  • 'Tis either a hare or a brake-bush.
  • 'Tis hard to swim against the stream.
  • 'Tis his turn to-day, it will be mine to-morrow.
  • 'Tis never too late to mend.
  • 'Tis not for everyone to catch a salmon.
  • 'Tis one beggar's woe, to see another by the door go.
  • 'Tis the mind ennobles, not the blood.
  • 'Tis too late to spare when the pocket is bare.
  • 'Tis too late to spare, When the bottom is bare.
  • 'Tis written, "What's not your own, that let alone."
  • A bad beginning may make a good ending.
  • A bad cause requires many words.
  • A bad penny always comes back.
  • A bad penny always turns up.
  • A baptised Jew is a circumcised Christian.
  • A bargain is a bargain.
  • A bashful dog never fattens.
  • A better seldom comes after.
  • A blind horse goes straightforward.
  • A blind leader of the blind.
  • A blind man swallows many a fly.
  • A bold does not always fall when it thunders.
  • A bold onset is half the battle.
  • A bolt does not always fall when it thunders.
  • A cat has nine lives, as the onion seven skins.
  • A cat in gloves catches no mice.
  • A cat is a lion to mouse.
  • A clean mouth and honest hand, will take a man through any land.
  • A close mouth and open eyes never did any one harm.
  • A close mouth catcheth no flies.
  • A country can be judged by the quality of its proverbs.
  • A dainty stomach beggars the purse.
  • A danger foreseen is half avoided.
  • A day after the fair.
  • A doctor and a boor know more than a doctor alone.
  • A dram of discretion is worth a pound of wisdom.
  • A drink is shorter than a tale.
  • A dripping June sets all in tune.
  • A drop of honey catches more flies than a hogshead of vinegar.
  • A father maintains ten children better than ten children one father.
  • A fence lasts three years, a dog lasts three fences, a horse three dogs, and a man three horses.
  • A fence makes love more keen.
  • A fish should swim thrice: in water, in sauce, and in wine.
  • A flatterer has water in one hand and fire in the other.
  • A glutton young, a beggar old.
  • A golden hammer breaks an iron gate.
  • A good conscience is a soft pillow.
  • A good meal is worth hanging for.
  • A good name is a rich inheritance.
  • A good speaker makes a good liar.
  • A good trade will carry farther than a thousand florins.
  • A gosling flew over the Rhine, and came home a goose.
  • A handful of might is better than a sack full of right.
  • A huckster who cannot pass off mouse-turd for pepper, has not learned his trade.
  • A hug a day keeps the demons at bay.
  • A hundred years of regret pay not a farthing of debt.
  • A hundred years of wrong do not make an hour of right.
  • A lawyer and a cart-wheel must be greased.
  • A lawyer and a wagon-wheel must be well greased.
  • A lean agreement is better than a fat lawsuit.
  • A light belly, heavy heart.
  • A load of March dust is worth a ducat.
  • A loaded wagon creaks; an empty one rattles.
  • A lordly taste make a beggar's purse.
  • A lovelorn cook oversalts the porridge.
  • A man has learned much who has learned how to die.
  • A man has two ears and one mouth that he hear much and speak little.
  • A man shows his character by what he laughs at.
  • A man surprised is half beaten.
  • A man warned is half saved.
  • A man's face is a lion's.
  • A man, a word; a word, a man.
  • A millstone gathers no moss.
  • A mistake is no fraud.
  • A monk in his cloister, a fish in the water, a thief in the gallows.
  • A nail secures the horse-shoe, the shoe the horse, the horse the man, the man the castle, and the castle the whole land.
  • A necessary lie is harmless.
  • A pack of cards is the devil's prayer-book.
  • A penny saved is a penny gained.
  • A penny saved is a penny got.
  • A penny saved is two-pence got.
  • A poor person isn't he who has little, but he who needs a lot.
  • A promise is a debt.
  • A prophet is not without honor save in his own country.
  • A proverb never lies, it is only its meaning which deceives.
  • A sack full of fleas is easier to watch than a woman.
  • A single penny fairly got, is worth a thousand that are not.
  • A single stroke don't fell the oak.
  • A small gift is better than a great promise.
  • A sparrow in the hand is better than a pigeon on the roof.
  • A teacher is better than two books.
  • A tear bedews my Delia's eye, From morn till dewy eve; But if you ask the reason why, She can't tell, I believe.
  • A thief seldom grows rich by thieving.
  • A thing is not bad if well understood.
  • A used plough shines, standing water stinks.
  • A wall between increases love.
  • A wise man, a strong man.
  • A woman keeps secret only what she does not know.
  • A woman strong in flounces is weak in the head.
  • A woman's vengeance knows no bounds.
  • A woman's work is never done.
  • A woman, a dog, and a walnut tree, the more you beat them the better they be.
  • A young doctor means a new graveyard.
  • A young wife is an old man's post-horse to the grave.
  • Abroad one has a hundred eyes, at home not one.
  • Abroad to see wonders the traveller goes, And neglects the fine things which lie under his nose.
  • Abundance begets indifference.
  • Adam must have an Eve, to blame for his own faults.
  • Advice is not compulsion.
  • Advice should precede the act.
  • Advising is easier than helping.
  • Advising is often better than fighting.
  • Affectation is a greater injury to the face than small-pox.
  • After Christmas comes Lent.
  • After clouds comes clear weather.
  • After dinner stand a while, or walk nearly half a mile.
  • Agree, for the law is costly.
  • All are not asleep who have their eyes shut.
  • All are not cooks who carry long knives.
  • All are not free who mock their chains.
  • All freight lightens, said the skipper, when he threw his wife overboard.
  • All goes down gutter lane.
  • All good things must come to an end.
  • All had rather it were well for themselves than for another.
  • All skill is in vain when an angel pees in the touchhole of your musket.
  • All wooers are rich, and all captives poor.
  • All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.
  • All your geese are swans.
  • All's fair in love and war.
  • Almost never killed a fly.
  • Always something new, seldom something good.
  • Ambition and fleas both jump high.
  • Amendment is repentance.
  • An egg is an egg, said the beadle, but he took the goose-egg.
  • An old broom knows the corners of the house.
  • An old error is always more popular than a new truth.
  • An old fox does not run twice into the snare.
  • An old man loved is a winter with flowers.
  • An ounce of mother-wit is worth a pound of school-wit.
  • An uneducated person is like an unpolished mirror.
  • Anger can't stand, without a strong hand.
  • Anger hears no counsel.
  • Anger without power is folly.
  • Another man's horse and your own spurs outrun the wind.
  • Apes remain apes, though you cloth them in velvet.
  • Appearances are deceitful.
  • Appearances are deceptive.
  • April weather, woman's love, rose-leaves, dice, and card-luck, change every moment.
  • Art holds fast when all else is lost.
  • As a man eats, so he works.
  • As a thing is used, so it brightens.
  • As a tree falls, so shall it lie.
  • As fast as laws are devised, their evasion is contrived.
  • As fortune is sought, so it is found.
  • As good be an addled egg as an idle bird.
  • As good eat the devil as the broth he was boiled in.
  • As he thinketh in his heart, so is he.
  • As is the gardener, so is the garden.
  • As princes fiddle, subjects must dance.
  • As soon a man is born he begins to die.
  • As the field, so the crops; as the father, so the sons.
  • As the labour, so the pay.
  • As the master, so the work.
  • As the mistress, so the maid.
  • As the old birds sings, the young ones twitter.
  • As the old cock crows so crows the young.
  • As the tree, so the fruit.
  • As the tree, so the fruit; as the mistress, so the maid.
  • As the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined.
  • As won, so spent.
  • As you bake so shall you brew.
  • Assertion is no proof.
  • Asses sing badly, because they pitch their voices too high.
  • Asses that bray most eat least.
  • At court there are many hands, but few hearts.
  • At evening the sluggard is busy.
  • Away from the battle all are soldiers.
  • Away with you, be a peddlar, a knave, says the hangman to his man.
  • Bacchus hath drowned more men than Neptune.
  • Bad bird, bad egg.
  • Bad eyes never see any good.
  • Bad money always comes back.
  • Bad money drives out good.
  • Bad tidings always come too soon.
  • Bad ware must be cried up.
  • Bargains are costly.
  • Be as you would seem to be.
  • Be not ashamed of your craft.
  • Be silent, or say something better than silence.
  • Be the thing you would be called.
  • Bear and bull catch no fox.
  • Beauty is a good letter of introduction.
  • Begin to weave and God will give the thread.
  • Beginning and ending shake hands.
  • Begun is half done.
  • Better a friendly denial than an unwilling compliance.
  • Better a good cow than a cow of a good kind.
  • Better a lean agreement than a fat lawsuit.
  • Better a lean peace than a fat victory.
  • Better a living dog than a dead lion.
  • Better a patch than a hole.
  • Better an honest enemy than a false friend.
  • Better an unjust peace than a just war.
  • Better ask twice than go wrong once.
  • Better badly mounted than proud on foot.
  • Better envy than pity.
  • Better free in a foreign land than a serf at home.
  • Better give nothing than stolen alms.
  • Better is an enemy to good.
  • Better is better.
  • Better one living word than a hundred dead ones.
  • Better something than nothing at all.
  • Better to go to bed supperless than run in debt.
  • Better, There he goes, than There he hangs.
  • Between a woman's "Yes" and "No" there is no room for the point of a needle.
  • Between neighbours' gardens a hedge is not amiss.
  • Between the hand and the lip the soup may be spilt.
  • Between wording and working is a long road.
  • Between wrangling and disputing truth is lost.
  • Betwixt two stools the doup fas down.
  • Beware of laughing hosts and weeping priests.
  • Beware of men who flourish hereditary honors.
  • Big churches, little saints.
  • Birds of prey do not sing.
  • Bitter pills are gilded.
  • Bitter pills may have wholesome effects.
  • Black cows give white milk.
  • Borrowing does well only once.
  • Both legs in the stocks or only one, 'tis all the same.
  • Bought wisdom is best.
  • Bought wit is best.
  • Boys avoid the bees that stung 'em.
  • Bread in one hand, a stone in the other.
  • Build golden bridges for the flying foe.
  • Building castles in the air.
  • Business before pleasure.
  • Bustle is not industry.
  • Buy when it is market time.
  • Buy your neighbour's ox, and woo your neighbour's daughter.
  • Buyers want a hundred eyes, sellers none.
  • Buyers want a hundred eyes, sellers only one.
  • Buying is cheaper than asking.
  • Care brings on grey hairs, and age without years.
  • Care killed the cat.
  • Charity gives itself rich, covetousness hoards itself poor.
  • Charity sees the need, not the cause.
  • Cheating is more honourable than stealing.
  • Cheating is the chapman's cart and plough.
  • Cheats never prosper.
  • Cheerful company shortens the miles.
  • Cheese and bread make the cheeks red.
  • Cheese is gold in the morning, silver at noon, and lead at night.
  • Christians have no neighbours.
  • Coffee and love are best when they are hot.
  • Cold hand, a warm heart.
  • Cold hands, warm heart.
  • Common fame is seldom to blame.
  • Compliments cost nothing, yet many pay dear for them.
  • Confidence begets confidence.
  • Constant dropping wears the stone.
  • Constant occupation prevents temptation.
  • Consult with your pillow.
  • Could everything be done twice, everything would be done better.
  • Councils of war never fight.
  • Count not your chickens before they are hatched.
  • Count your blessings.
  • Cowards have no luck.
  • Cowards may die many times before their death.
  • Crazy wheels run longest.
  • Credit is better than ready money.
  • Crooked wood burns quite as well as straight.
  • Cunning surpasses strength.
  • Curiosity killed the cat.
  • Daughter-in-law hates mother-in-law.
  • Daughters are easy to rear, but hard to marry.
  • Dear physic always does good, if not to the patient, at least to the apothecary.
  • Debtors are liars.
  • Deferred is not annulled.
  • Devils must be driven out with devils.
  • Disputing and borrowing cause grief and sorrowing.
  • Dissemblers oftener deceive themselves than others.
  • Distance lends enchantment to the view.
  • Do not despise an insignificant enemy, nor a slight wound.
  • Do not divide the spoil till the victory is won.
  • Do not ship all in one bottom.
  • Do what thou doest. (Age quod agis.)
  • Doctor Luther's shoes do not fit every parish priest.
  • Dogs that bark much don't bite.
  • Doing nothing is doing ill.
  • Doing nothing teaches doing ill.
  • Don't budge, if you sit at ease.
  • Don't carry your head too high, the door is low.
  • Don't cast your pearls before swine.
  • Don't change horses in mid stream.
  • Don't change horses in midstream.
  • Don't cry "Hurra!" till you are over the ditch.
  • Don't cry before you are hurt.
  • Don't cry before you're hurt.
  • Don't cry fish before they're caught.
  • Don't cry hurra! till your are over the hedge (till you are out of the wood).
  • Don't divide the spoil before the victory is won.
  • Don't fly till your wings are feathered.
  • Don't get mad, get even.
  • Don't learn too much, Jack, else you must do a great deal.
  • Don't reckon without your host.
  • Don't sell the bear-skin before you have killed the bear.
  • Don't throw away your dirty water till you have got clean.
  • Dreams are froth.
  • Drink upon salad costs the doctor a ducat; drink upon eggs costs him two.
  • Drinking a little too much is drinking a great deal too much.
  • Drive a rat into a corner, and he'll jump at you.
  • Drive gently over the stones.
  • Drive not a second nail till the first be clinched.
  • Ducats are clipped, pence are not.
  • Ducks quack loudly before a rain.
  • Dumb dogs and still water are dangerous.
  • Early marriage, long love.
  • Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.
  • Early to rise and late to bed, lifts again the debtor's head.
  • Eating and drinking holds body and soul together.
  • Either fight not with priests or beat them to death.
  • Empty casks make the most sound.
  • Enough is better than a sackful.
  • Entreat him in jackass fashion; if he won't carry the sack, give him a whack.
  • Envy eats nothing but its own heart.
  • Envy envies itself.
  • Erring is not cheating.
  • Even a hair casts its shadow.
  • Even the best hack stumbles once.
  • Even the lion must defend himself against the flies.
  • Ever one hair, only one, and the man is bald at last.
  • Every beginning is hard, said the thief, when he began by stealing an anvil.
  • Every clown can find fault, though it would puzzle him to do better.
  • Every cock crows best on his own dunghill.
  • Every fool is different.
  • Every hare may pluck the dead lion's mane.
  • Every herring must hang by its own gill.
  • Every labourer is worthy of his hire.
  • Every land has its own law.
  • Every light is not the sun.
  • Every man for himself, and God for us all.
  • Every man for himself, and the Devil take the hindmost.
  • Every man is dearest to himself.
  • Every man is the best interpreter of his own words.
  • Every man rides his own hobby.
  • Every mother's child is handsome.
  • Every one basteth the fat hog, while the lean one burneth.
  • Every one counts for as much as he has.
  • Every one has his master.
  • Every one is emperor on his own ground.
  • Every one is glad to see a knave caught in his own trap.
  • Every one is wise after the event.
  • Every one must pay his debt to nature.
  • Every one thinks his own a falcon.
  • Every one thinks that all the bells echo his own thoughts.
  • Every priestling conceals a popeling.
  • Every woman would rather be handsome than good.
  • Everybody is the architect oh is own fortune.
  • Everybody knows best where his own shoe pinches.
  • Everybody knows good counsel except him who has need of it.
  • Everybody must wear out one pair of fool's shoes, if he wear no more.
  • Everybody thinks his own cuckoo sings better than another's nightingale.
  • Everybody's busy is nobody's business.
  • Everybody's companion is nobody's friend.
  • Everybody's friend, everybody's fool.
  • Everything would be well were there not a "but."
  • Except for the night, we could never know the stars.
  • Exchange is no robbery.
  • Fair flowers to not remain long by the wayside.
  • Fair hair may hae foul roots.
  • Fair words don't fill the pocket.
  • Fancy requires much, necessity but little.
  • Fat hens lay few eggs.
  • Fir and water are good servants, but bad masters.
  • Fire and faggot are but sad reformers.
  • Fire in the heart sends smoke into the head.
  • Fire is a good servant but a bad master.
  • First look at home, then censure me.
  • First weigh, then venture.
  • Fish begin to stink at the head.
  • Five fingers hold more than two forks.
  • Flatterers are cats that lick before and scratch behind.
  • Flatterers haunt not cottages.
  • Follow Love and it will flee, Flee love and it will follow thee.
  • Fools build houses, wise men buy them.
  • Fools for luck.
  • Fools must not be set on eggs.
  • Fools refuse favours.
  • Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.
  • For love the wolf eats the sheep.
  • For the diligent, a week has seven days; for the slothful, seven tomorrows.
  • For the upright there are no laws.
  • Forbearance is no acquittance.
  • Forbidden fruit is sweet.
  • Force me, and I shall commit no sin, said the girl.
  • Fore-talk spares after-talk.
  • Forgive and forget.
  • Forgive thyself nothing and others much.
  • Forgiven is not forgotten.
  • Fortune and misfortune are neighbors.
  • Fortune and misfortune are two buckets in a well.
  • Fortune and women are partial to fools.
  • Fortune give many too much, but no one enough.
  • Fortune gives her hand to a bold man.
  • Fortune is like women: loves youth and is fickle.
  • Free man, free goods.
  • Full vessels give the least sound.
  • Funeral sermon, lying sermon.
  • Gifts are according to the giver.
  • Give unto the king what is the king's, and unto God what is God's.
  • Give up the smallest part of a secret, and the rest is no longer in your power.
  • Go to the law for a sheep and lose your cow.
  • God cures the sick, and the doctor gets the money.
  • God gives the nuts but he does not crack them.
  • God gives, but man must open his hand.
  • God is everywhere, except where he has a delegate.
  • God's friends, the priest's foe.
  • God's mill goes slowly, but it grinds well.
  • Gold goes in at any gate.
  • Gold lies deep in the mountain, dirt on the highway.
  • Gold may be bought too dear.
  • Gone is gone; no Jew will lend upon it.
  • Good counsel comes over night.
  • Good counsel never comes too late.
  • Good faith is a seldom guest, when you have him, hold him fast.
  • Good faith stole the cow.
  • Good luck, with good looking after!
  • Good people live far asunder.
  • Good thongs may be cut out of other people's hides.
  • Good wine is milk for the aged.
  • Good wine ruins the purse, and bad the stomach.
  • Got with the fife, spent with the drum.
  • Great cry and little wool, said the fool, when he sheared a pig.
  • Great fish are caught in great waters.
  • Great men may just with saints.
  • Great men's servants don't think little of themselves.
  • Great men's vices are accounted sacred.
  • Great minds think alike.
  • Great oaks from little acorns grow.
  • Great say-masters, bad pay-masters.
  • Great talkers are commonly liars.
  • Great trees give more shade than fruit.
  • Greatness alone in not enough, or the cow would outrun the hare.
  • Greedy fowk hae long arms.
  • Green Christmas, a white Easter.
  • Hackney mistress, Hackney maid.
  • Had I known is a poor man.
  • Half a house is half a hell.
  • Half a loaf is better than no bread.
  • Handsome is the handsome does.
  • Happy is the one who forgets that which cannot be changed.
  • Hard against hard never was good.
  • Hares are caught with hounds, fools with praise, and women with gold.
  • Hasten at leisure.
  • Hat in hand goes through the land.
  • Having is haying, come whence it may.
  • He goes about it like a cat round hot milk.
  • He goes as willingly as a thief to the gallows.
  • He has beans in his ears.
  • He has given the hen for the egg.
  • He has his finger in every pie.
  • He is a bad shot who cannot find an excuse.
  • He is a bad smith who cannot bear smoke.
  • He is a bad workman who cannot talk of work.
  • He is a fool and ever shall, Who writes his name upon a wall.
  • He is lucky who forgets what cannot be mended.
  • He is rich enough who is contented.
  • He laughs at scars who never felt a wound.
  • He laughs best who laughs last.
  • He laughs ill that laughs himself to death.
  • He must have keen eyes that would know a maid at sight.
  • He plays best, who wins.
  • He sticks his nose in everything.
  • He struck at Tib, but down fell Tim.
  • He that always thinks it is too soon is sure to come too late.
  • He that asketh faintly beggeth a denial.
  • He that climbs high, falls heavily.
  • He that finds fault wants to buy.
  • He that has good legs, has often bad boots.
  • He that has lost his credit is dead to the world.
  • He that has no head, need no hat.
  • He that hunts others, must run himself.
  • He that marries for love has good nights, but sorry days.
  • He that may not as he wad, maun do as he may.
  • He that peeps into every bush will hardly get into the wood.
  • He that pelts every barking dog, must pick up a great many stones.
  • He that picks up all sorts of wood, soon gets an armful.
  • He that says A, must also say B.
  • He that sits among reeds, cuts pipes when he pleases.
  • He that wants the kernel must crack the nut.
  • He that will not be saved needs no preacher.
  • He that won't listen, must feel.
  • He that would cheat a Jew, must be a Jew.
  • He that would eat the fruit must climb the tree.
  • He that would stop everybody's mouth needs plenty of flour.
  • He who always thinks it is too soon, is sure to come too late.
  • He who begins much, finishes little.
  • He who blackens others does not whiten himself.
  • He who blows in the fire will get sparks in his eyes.
  • He who borrows sells his freedom.
  • He who brings bad tidings, comes soon enough.
  • He who brings, is welcome.
  • He who builds by the road-side has many masters.
  • He who builds on the public way, must let the people have their say.
  • He who buys a house gets many a plank and nail for nothing.
  • He who buys what he don't want, will soon sell what he does want.
  • He who can does, he who cannot, teaches.
  • He who cannot help, may hinder.
  • He who cannot paint must grind the colours.
  • He who cannot pay with his purse, must pay with his hide.
  • He who cheats a cheat and robs a thief, earns a dispensation for 100 years.
  • He who conceits himself wise, has an ass near at hand.
  • He who conquers his anger has conquered an enemy.
  • He who digs a pit for others falls into it himself.
  • He who does not bait his hook catches nothing.
  • He who does not go forward, stays behind.
  • He who does not improve to-day will grow worse to-morrow.
  • He who does not open his eyes must open his purse.
  • He who envies, suffers.
  • He who fain would marry, in choice should not tarry.
  • He who finds what has not been lost, will chance to die before he is ill.
  • He who follows the crowd has many companions.
  • He who forces love when none is found, remains a fool the whole year round.
  • He who gives quickly, gives doubly.
  • He who gives to the poor, lends to the Lord.
  • He who gives, must take (meaning a joke).
  • He who goes to bed with dogs, will wake up with fleas.
  • He who grasps at all, holds nothing fast.
  • He who grasps too much lets much fall.
  • He who handles pitch, besmears himself.
  • He who has a glass roof must not throw stones at others.
  • He who has good neighbours, gets a good morning.
  • He who has left a rogue behind him, has made a good day's journey.
  • He who has not tasted bitter, knows not what sweet is.
  • He who has once burnt his mouth always blows his soup.
  • He who has once invited the devil into his house, will never be rid of him.
  • He who has one foot in a brothel, has the other in a hospital.
  • He who has the Pope for his cousin may soon be a Cardinal.
  • He who has the fortune brings home the bride.
  • He who has three enemies must agree with two.
  • He who has to do with foxes must look after his hen-roost.
  • He who has victory, has right.
  • He who hath ears to hear, let him hear.
  • He who heeds not the lost shoe-nail, will soon lose the horse.
  • He who holds the ladder is as bad as the thief.
  • He who inherits a farthing, is expected to disburse a dollar.
  • He who is absent is always in the wrong.
  • He who is afraid of doing too much, always does too little.
  • He who is always drinking and stuffing, will in time become a ragamuffin.
  • He who is born to misfortunate stumbles as he goes, and though he fall on his back will fracture his nose.
  • He who is feared by many, fears many.
  • He who is his own teacher, has a fool for his pupil.
  • He who is judge between two friends, loses one of them.
  • He who is not for me, is against me.
  • He who is of on use to himself, is of no use to any one else.
  • He who is quick at borrowing, is slow in paying.
  • He who lends to the poor gets his interest from God.
  • He who lies in the grave, is well lodged.
  • He who lies on the ground must expect to be trodden on.
  • He who likes cherries soon learns to climb.
  • He who lives by the church shall serve the church.
  • He who lives by the sword dies by the sword.
  • He who lives in a glass house should be the last to throw stones.
  • He who lives on hope, dies of hunger.
  • He who looks on know more of the game than he who plays.
  • He who makes a mouse of himself, will be eaten by the cats.
  • He who makes friends of all keeps none.
  • He who makes himself honey, will be eaten by the flies.
  • He who makes himself nothing, is nothing.
  • He who marries does well, but who remains single does better.
  • He who pays his debts, betters his condition.
  • He who pays well may borrow again.
  • He who pitches too high won't get through his song.
  • He who plants a garden plants happiness.
  • He who ploughs with young oxen, makes crooked furrows.
  • He who praises himself must have bad neighbours.
  • He who praises in praesentia, and abuses in absentia, have with him pestilentia.
  • He who prates much, lies much.
  • He who prizes little things, is worthy of great ones.
  • He who saves in little things, can be liberal in great ones.
  • He who serves small masters, is himself one of them.
  • He who serves the people has a bad master.
  • He who shoots often, hits at last.
  • He who sleeps along keeps long cold, two soon warm each other.
  • He who stands godfather to a wolf should have a dog under his cloak.
  • He who stops half way is only half in error.
  • He who takes no care of little things, will not have the care of great ones.
  • He who teaches children learns more than they do.
  • He who tickles himself, laughs when he likes.
  • He who travels with hope, has poverty for his coachman.
  • He who treads on eggs, must tread lightly.
  • He who will have eggs, must bear with the cackling.
  • He who wipes the child's nose, means to kiss the mother's cheek.
  • He who won't be advised, can't be helped.
  • He who would climb the ladder must begin at the bottom.
  • He who would go further than his horse, must alight and go on foot.
  • He who would prosper in peace, must suffer in silence.
  • He who would rule must hear and be deaf, see and be blind.
  • He who would succeed at court, must lie sometimes low, sometimes high.
  • He who would the daughter win, with the mother must begin.
  • He whose mistress squints, says the ogles.
  • Herod and Pilate are good friends!
  • Hide not your light under a bushel.
  • High houses are mostly empty in the upper story.
  • High regions are never without storms.
  • His hens lay eggs with two yolks.
  • Hobby horses are dearer than Arabians.
  • Hold a candle to the devil!
  • Honesty lasts longest.
  • How easily a hair gets into the butter!
  • How many daily read the Bible, and yet pursue their course of evil.
  • How many daily read the Word, and yet from vice are not deterred.
  • Hungry flies sting sore.
  • Hurry no man's cattle.
  • Hussars pray for war, and the doctor for fever.
  • I can see as far into a mill-stone as another man.
  • I have had is a poor man.
  • I have is a better bird than "If I had."
  • I rest, therefore I rust.
  • I want no drones in my bee-hive.
  • I wept when I was born, and every day shows why.
  • I will not bite any dog, says the shepherd's dog, "for I must save my teeth for the wolf."
  • I will not change a cottage in possession for a kingdom in reversion.
  • I will win the horse, or lose the saddle.
  • I would rather have a dog my friend than enemy.
  • Idleness has poverty for wages.
  • Idleness is the beginning of all sin.
  • Idleness is the root of all evil.
  • Idleness is the sepulchre of a living man.
  • If I am seen, I am joking; if I am not seen, I steal.
  • If I am to be drowned, it shall be in clean water.
  • If I canna do't by might, I'll do't by sleight.
  • If I cannot move the powers above, Acheron itself shall be appealed to. [If fair means cannot, foul shall.]
  • If I rest, I rust, says the key.
  • If a dog's prayers were answered, bones would rain from the skies.
  • If a man would know what he is, let him anger his neighbours.
  • If every one were wise, a fool would be the prize.
  • If fools were to eat no bread, corn would be cheap.
  • If some men knew who some men were, then some would pay the more honour there.
  • If the bitch were not in haste, she would not litter blind puppies.
  • If the brain sows not corn, it plants thistles.
  • If the eye does not want to see, neither light nor glasses will help.
  • If the landlady is fair, the wine is fair.
  • If the prince wants an apple, his servants take the tree.
  • If the servant grows rich and the master poor, they are both good for nothing.
  • If the shoe fits, wear it.
  • If the wolf had stayed in the wood there would have been no hue and cry after him.
  • If the wolf would cease his running, the people would cease their shouting.
  • If there be a hell, Rome is built over it.
  • If we pay for the music we will take part in the dance.
  • If wood-hewing were an order, there would be fewer monks.
  • If you are an anvil, be patient; if you are a hammer, strike hard.
  • If you can't get it in bushels, take it in spoonfuls.
  • If you don't light fires, smoke won't get in your eyes.
  • If you don't like the heat, get out of the kitchen.
  • If you don't make mistakes you don't make anything.
  • If you have a good friend, you don't need a mirror.
  • If you have no arrows in your quiver, go not with archers.
  • If you have no money, turn placeman! as the court fool said to his sovereign.
  • If you want fire, look for it in the ashes.
  • If you want peace, you must prepare for war.
  • If you would have the lamp burn, you must pour oil into it.
  • If you've money, take a seat; it you've none, take to your feet.
  • Ill got, ill spent.
  • Ill gotten goods never thrive.
  • Ill gotten goods seldom prosper.
  • Ill-gotten goods seldom prosper.
  • In Blindman's land your one-eyed man's a god.
  • In a calm sea, every man is a pilot.
  • In bad luck, hold out; in good luck, hold in.
  • In old houses many mice, in old furs many lice.
  • In the evening one may praise the day.
  • In the looking-glass we see our form, in wine the heart.
  • In time of war the devil makes more room in hell.
  • Industry is the parent of fortune.
  • Ingratitude is the world's reward.
  • Ingratitude sickens benevolence.
  • Instead of complaining that the rosebush is full of thorns, be happy that the thorn bush has roses.
  • Intemperance is the doctor's wet-nurse.
  • Invalids live longest.
  • It is a bad hen that lays in neighbour's houses.
  • It is a bad horse that does not earn his fodder.
  • It is a poor fox that has but one hole.
  • It is bad baking without flour and water.
  • It is bad preaching to deaf ears.
  • It is better the child should cry than the father.
  • It is better to deal with a whole fool than half a fool.
  • It is better to turn back than go astray.
  • It is dear honey that must be licked off thorns.
  • It is easier to blame than do better.
  • It is easier to build two hearths than always to keep fire on one.
  • It is easier to descend than ascend.
  • It is easier to guard against a bushel of fleas than a woman.
  • It is easy to help him, who is willing to be helped.
  • It is hard to catch birds with an empty hand.
  • It is hard to steal where the host himself is a thief.
  • It is harder work getting to hell than to heaven.
  • It is human to err, but diabolical to persevere.
  • It is idle to swallow the cow and choke on the tail.
  • It is more necessary to guard the mouth than the chest.
  • It is more painful to do nothing than something.
  • It is not always good to be wise.
  • It is not good to be the poet of a village.
  • It is not till the cow has lost her tail, that she discovers its value.
  • It is not want but abundance that makes avarice.
  • It is too much to expect of a cat that she should sit by the milk and not lap it.
  • It's a poor sheep that cannot carry its own wool.
  • It's a sin to steal a pin.
  • It's not healthy to swallow books without chewing.
  • Jack gets on by his stupidity.
  • Jacob's voice, Esau's hands.
  • Jealousy is a pain which eagerly seeks what causes pain.
  • Joy and sorrow are next door neighbours.
  • Joy and sorrow are to-day and to-morrow.
  • Judges should have two ears, both alike.
  • Justice has a waxen nose.
  • Keep well with your neighbours, whether right or wrong.
  • Keep within compass and you may be sure, That you will not suffer what others endure.
  • Keep within compass.
  • Kindness breaks no bones.
  • Kindnesses, like grain, increase by sowing.
  • Knowing hens lay even in nettles.
  • Late fruit keeps well.
  • Lawyers are bad Christians.
  • Lawyers' gowns are lined with the wilfulness of their clients.
  • Lazybones take all day to get started.
  • Lean liberty is better than fat slavery.
  • Learned fools are the greatest fools.
  • Learned fools exceed all fools.
  • Less advice and more hands.
  • Less is more.
  • Let every one sweep before his own door.
  • Let every pedlar carry his own pack.
  • Let him who is well off hold his tongue.
  • Let not thy right hand know what thy left hand doeth.
  • Let people take and dogs bark.
  • Let sleeping dogs lie.
  • Let the dead rest.
  • Let the devil get into the church, and he will mount the altar.
  • Let the guest go before the storm bursts.
  • Let your head be more than a funnel to your stomach.
  • Let your purse be your master.
  • Let your trouble tarry till its own day comes.
  • Lies melt the snow.
  • Light burdens carried far become heavy.
  • Light come, light go.
  • Light is light, though the blind man see it not.
  • Like blood, like means, and like age, make the happiest marriage.
  • Like will to like, as the devil said to the coal-burner.
  • Little and often makes a heap in time.
  • Little enemies and little wounds are not to be despised.
  • Little fishes make the pike big.
  • Little folks are fond of talking about what great folks do.
  • Locks and keys are not made for honest fingers.
  • Long borrowed is not given.
  • Long choosing and cheapening ends in buying nothing, or bad wares.
  • Long fasting is no economy of food.
  • Long foretold, long last; short notice, soon past.
  • Long is not for ever.
  • Long-talked-of (or looked-for) comes at last.
  • Look before you leap, For snakes among sweet flowers do creep.
  • Loquacity and lying are cousins.
  • Love begins at home.
  • Love can do much, money can do all.
  • Love cannot be bought or sold, its only price is love.
  • Love grows with obstacles.
  • Love knows hidden paths.
  • Love without return is like a question without an answer.
  • Love your neighbor, but don't tear down your fence.
  • Love your neighbour, but don't pull down the fence.
  • Love's anger is fuel to love.
  • Love, fire, a cough, the itch, and gout are not to be concealed.
  • Love, thieves, and fear, make ghosts.
  • Loving and singing are not to be forced.
  • Lying is the first step to the gallows.
  • Maidens say no, and mean yes.
  • Maids say nay, and take.
  • Make the best of a bad bargain.
  • Make the cap fit the head.
  • Make yourself an ass, and every one will lay his sack on you.
  • Make yourself an ass, and you'll have every man's sack on your shoulders.
  • Man loves but once.
  • Man without woman, is head without body; woman without man, is body without head.
  • Many a good cow has a bad calf.
  • Many a one threatens, while he quakes for fear.
  • Many can help one.
  • Many can pack the cards that cannot play.
  • Many children, and little bread, is a painful pleasure.
  • Many cooks spoil the broth.
  • Many go out for wool, and come home shorn.
  • Many hands make quick work.
  • Many have good intentions, but something comes across them.
  • Many look with one eye at what they give, but with seven at what they receive.
  • Many see more with one eye that others with two.
  • Many shun the brook, and fall into the river.
  • Many shun the sword, and come to the gallows.
  • Many small make a great.
  • Many take by the bushel, and give with the spoon.
  • Many trades, begging the best.
  • Many who build castles in the air cannot build a hut on earth.
  • Marriage is heaven and hell.
  • Marrying in the blood is never good.
  • Marrying is easy, but housekeeping is hard.
  • Merchant to-day, beggar to-morrow.
  • Millers and bakers do not steal, people bring to them.
  • Millers, tailors, and weavers are not hanged, or the trade would soon be extinct.
  • Mind over matter.
  • Mind your own business.
  • Misfortune, wood, and hair, grow throughout the year.
  • Misreckoning is no payment.
  • Money in the purse dispels melancholy.
  • Money taken, freedom forsaken.
  • Money talks.
  • Monks, mice, rats, vermin, seldom sunder without harming.
  • Mony sma's mak a great.
  • More afraid than hurt.
  • More are drowned in the bowl than in the sea.
  • More belongs to riding than a pair of boots.
  • More is done with words than with hands.
  • Mother's truth keeps constant youth.
  • Mother, I must have a husband, or I shall set fire to the house.
  • Mouth and heart are wide apart.
  • Much money, much friends.
  • Much taste, much waste.
  • Much wisdom is lost in poor men's mouths.
  • Much wit is lost in a poor man's purse.
  • Mules make a great fuss about their ancestors having been horses.
  • Murder will out.
  • Must is a hard nut.
  • My friend's enemy is often my best friend.
  • Nature and love cannot be hid.
  • Nature draws stronger then seven oxen.
  • Nature has given us two ears, two eyes, and but one tongue.
  • Nature requires little, fancy much.
  • Nature teaches us to love our friends, but religion our enemies.
  • Necessity seeks bread where it is to be found.
  • Necessity teaches arts.
  • Necessity teaches even the lame to dance.
  • Necessity unites hearts.
  • Neck or nothing.
  • Neighbour once over the hedge, neighbour over it again.
  • Neutrals are soused from above, and singed from below.
  • Neutrals tread on eggs and break none.
  • Never fell oak at the very first stroke.
  • Never fight an enemy whilst it is possible to cheat him.
  • Never give advice unasked.
  • Never give the skin when you can pay with the wool.
  • Never grieve over spilt milk.
  • Never murder a man who is about to commit suicide.
  • Never trust to another what you should do yourself.
  • New churches and new taverns are seldom empty.
  • New come, welcome.
  • New doctor, new churchyard.
  • New laws, new roguery.
  • New songs are eagerly sung.
  • No ape but swears he has the handsomest children.
  • No armour is proof against the gallows.
  • No house without a mouse, no barn without corn, no rose without a thorn.
  • No house without a mouse.
  • No jealousy, no love.
  • No man can do nothing and no man can do everything.
  • No man can like all, or be liked by all.
  • No man's master, no master's man.
  • No one betrays himself by silence.
  • No one can blow and swallow at the same time.
  • No one can complain of the sea who twice suffers shipwreck.
  • No one can do nothing, and no one can do everything.
  • No one can guard against treachery.
  • No one is too old to learn.
  • No one is wise enough to advise himself.
  • No one knows better where the shoe pinches that he who wears it.
  • No one likes to bell the cat.
  • No one sees his own faults.
  • No pains, no gains.
  • No penny, no paternoster.
  • No pride like that of an enriched beggar.
  • No smoke without fire.
  • No song, no supper.
  • No tree falls at the first stroke.
  • No tree so small but it can cast a shade.
  • No use in flogging a dead horse.
  • No villain like the conscientious villain.
  • No viper so little but hath its venom.
  • No woman marries an old man for God's sake.
  • Noble and common blood is of the same color.
  • Noble is, that noble does.
  • Nobody is to blame for all.
  • Nobody so wise but has a little folly to spare.
  • Not all flowers are fit for nosegays.
  • Not every ass has long ears.
  • Not every ball hits.
  • Not every land has all at hand.
  • Not every one may pluck roses.
  • Not to be ashamed of sin is to sin double.
  • Not too little, not too much.
  • Nothing bolder than the miller's shirt, that every morning collars a thief.
  • Nothing dries sooner than tears.
  • Nothing is so new as what has long been forgotten.
  • Nothing looks more like a man of sense than a fool who holds his tongue.
  • Nothing should be done in a hurry except catching fleas.
  • Nothing should be done in haste but gripping a flea.
  • Nothing so bad as not to be good for something.
  • Nothing weighs lighter than a promise.
  • Nought is good for the eyes, but not for the stomach.
  • Nought is never in danger.
  • Nought needs no hiding-place.
  • Nurenberg wit and a skilful hand, will find their way through every land.
  • O what we must suffer for the sake of God's church! said the abbot, when the roast fowl burned his fingers.
  • Of big words and feathers may go to the pound.
  • Of war all can tattle, away from the battle.
  • Of what use is it that the cow gives plenty of milk, if she upset the pail.
  • Of words and feathers, it takes many to make a pound.
  • Offend one monk, and the lappets of all cowls will flutter as far as Rome.
  • Offenders never pardon.
  • Office without pay makes thieves.
  • Often shooting hits the mark.
  • Old birds are hard to pluck.
  • Old churches have dark windows.
  • Old crows are hard to catch.
  • Old love does not rust.
  • Old oxen tread hard.
  • Old people see best in the distance.
  • Old pigs have hard snouts.
  • Old pottage is sooner heated than new made.
  • Old trees are not to be bent.
  • Old wounds easily bleed.
  • On Saint Thomas the Divine kill all turkeys, geese and swine.
  • On poor people's beards the young barber learns his trade.
  • Once is people's mouths, 'tis hard to get well out of them.
  • Once upon a time, no time.
  • One "take this" is better than ten "God help you!"
  • One ass nicknames another "Long-ears."
  • One bad apple spoils the bunch.
  • One bad eye spoils the other.
  • One bee is as good as a handful of flies.
  • One bird in the dish is better than a hundred in the air.
  • One can speak and seven can sing.
  • One cannot keep peace longer than his neighbour will let him.
  • One cannot love and be wise.
  • One cannot wash a blackamoor white.
  • One catches the hare, another eats it.
  • One coward makes ten.
  • One does evil enough when one does nothing good.
  • One dog growls to see another go into the kitchen.
  • One enemy can harm you more than a hundred friends can do you good.
  • One foe is too many, and a hundred friends are too few.
  • One fool may ask more questions than seven wise men can answer.
  • One fool praises another.
  • One hair of a woman draws more than a bell-rope.
  • One half of the world does not know how the other half lives.
  • One half the world laughs at the other half.
  • One has only to die to be praised.
  • One hour's sleep before midnight is better than two after it.
  • One hour's sleep before midnight is worth two after.
  • One kisses the child for the mother's sake, and the mother for the child's sake.
  • One kisses the nurse for the sake of the child.
  • One link broken, the whole chain is broken.
  • One log does not burn long by itself.
  • One man is another's devil.
  • One man knocks in the nail, and another hangs his hat on it.
  • One man may steal a horse while another may not look over the hedge.
  • One man's story is no story; hear both sides.
  • One marriage is never celebrated but another grows out of it.
  • One may see through a wall, if there's a hole in it.
  • One must glean at harvest time.
  • One must plough with the horses he has.
  • One rotten egg spoils the whole pudding.
  • One rotten sheepe will marre a whole flocke.
  • One scabbed sheep will infect a whole flock.
  • One shoe will not fit every foot.
  • One should be born either a king or a fool.
  • One story is good till another is told.
  • One sword keep another in the sheath.
  • One to-day is better than ten to-morrows.
  • One to-day is worth two to-morrows.
  • One wedge drives another.
  • One white foot, buy him; two white feet, try him; three white feet, look well about him; four white feet, go without him.
  • Only one can be emperor.
  • Open hand makes open hand.
  • Other towns, other lasses.
  • Our neighbour's children are always the worst.
  • Out of a little grass comes a great ass.
  • Ox, keep to your grass.
  • Painted flowers are scentless.
  • Paper is patient.
  • Pardoning the bad is injuring the good.
  • Pay in like coin.
  • Pay-day comes every day.
  • Peacock, look at your legs.
  • Pearls of wisdom.
  • Penny is penny's brother.
  • People often change and seldom for the better.
  • People show their character by what they laugh at.
  • Piety, prudence, wit, and civility, are the elements of true nobility.
  • Pigeons are taken when crows fly at pleasure.
  • Pilgrims seldom come home saints.
  • Pills must be bolted, not chewed.
  • Places are God's; placemen are the devil's.
  • Plants oft removed never thrive.
  • Play not with a man till you hurt him, nor jest till you shame him.
  • Politeness is what warmth is to wax.
  • Politeness travels on short fares.
  • Poor people's words go many to a sackful.
  • Poverty and hunger have many learned disciples.
  • Poverty craves many things, but avarice more.
  • Poverty is cunning; it catches even a fox.
  • Poverty is the sixth sense.
  • Praise a fine day at night.
  • Praising is not loving.
  • Presents keep friendship warm.
  • Priestly knaves sweat hard at their meat, but never at work get into a heat.
  • Priests and women never forget.
  • Priests bless themselves first.
  • Priests even smile pleasantly on young women.
  • Priests pay each other no tithes.
  • Priests should not prate out of the confessional.
  • Princes have long hands and many ears.
  • Promises are like the full moon: if they are not kept at once they diminish day by day.
  • Promises don't fill the belly.
  • Promises make debts.
  • Promises may make friends, but 'tis performances that keep them.
  • Proverbs are like butterflies, some are caught and some fly away.
  • Prudent men choose frugal wives.
  • Prudent pauses forward business.
  • Put out the fire betimes, ere it reach the roof.
  • Put the light out, and all women are alike.
  • Quick at meat, quick at work.
  • Quick believers need broad shoulders.
  • Quick come, quick go.
  • Quick enough, if but good enough.
  • Ragged colts make the handsomest stallions.
  • Raise no more devils than you can lay.
  • Reason doe not come before years.
  • Red is Love's colour, said the wooer to his foxy charmer.
  • Red sky at night, sailor's delight. Red sky at morning, sailors take warning.
  • Red sky at night, shepherd's delight; red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning.
  • Red sky in the morning, shepherds warning.
  • Rejoiced in youth, repented in age.
  • Rent and Taxes never sleep.
  • Repentance is the heart's medicine.
  • Report makes the wolf bigger than he is.
  • Rest comes from unrest, and unrest from rest.
  • Revenge converts a little right into a great wrong.
  • Revenge does not long remain unrevenged.
  • Revenge in cold blood is the devil's own act and deed.
  • Revenge is new wrong.
  • Revenge is sweet.
  • Revenge of an hundred years old hath still its sucking teeth.
  • Revenge remains not unrevenged.
  • Rich gamblers and old trumpeters are rare.
  • Rich people are everywhere at home.
  • Riches abuse them who know not how to use them.
  • Riches cause arrogance; poverty, meekness.
  • Right is with the strongest.
  • Roses and maidens soon lose their bloom.
  • Safe over the bridge, one laughs at St. Nepomuck.
  • Said in sport, meant in earnest.
  • Saint Martin was an easy man, he loved to drink Cerevisiam; and when he'd no Pecuniam, he left in pledge his Tunicam.
  • Salt and bread make the cheeks red.
  • Samson was a strong man, but he could not pay money before he had it.
  • Satiety causes disgust.
  • Saving is a greater art than gaining.
  • Scratch a Russian and you find a Tartar.
  • Scratch a lover and find an enemy.
  • Scratching and borrowing do well enough, but not for long.
  • Security is nowhere safe.
  • Security is the first cause of misfortune.
  • Self is the man.
  • Self-done, is soon done.
  • Self-love is bad, and makes the eyes sad.
  • Self-praise stinks, friends praise hinks, the stranger's is sincere, and may last for a year.
  • Self-preservation is the first law of nature.
  • Services unrequired go unrequited.
  • Set a beggar on a horse and he'll ride to the devil.
  • Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll outride the devil.
  • Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the Devil.
  • She is fond of him - on the side where the pocket hangs.
  • Short hair is soon brushed.
  • Sickly body, sickly mind.
  • Silence and reflection cause no dejection.
  • Silk and velvet put out the kitchen fire.
  • Silks and satins put out the kitchen fire.
  • Singed cats live long.
  • Singers, lovers, and poets are privileged liars.
  • Slaughter no more than you can well salt.
  • Small profits and often, are better than large profits and seldom.
  • Small profits are often, are better than large profits and seldom.
  • Small saints too work miracles.
  • Small undertakings give great comfort.
  • So it goes in the world: one has the purse, the other has the gold.
  • Soldiers must be well paid, and well hanged.
  • Solitude is the nurse of wisdom.
  • Something to every one is good division.
  • Speak little, speak truth. Spend little, pay cash.
  • Speak, that I may see thee.
  • Speaking comes by nature, silence by understanding.
  • Speedy rise, speedy fall.
  • Spend not, where you may save; spare not, where you must spend.
  • Spending your money with many a guest, empties the kitchen, the cellar and chest.
  • Stagnant water grows stinking.
  • Stand up, farthing, let the florin sit down.
  • Standing pools gather filth.
  • Straying shepherd, straying sheep.
  • Stretch your legs according to your coverlet.
  • Stretch yourself according to your cover-lid.
  • Strong folks have strong maladies.
  • Success to you! God speed the craft! as the hangman said to the judge.
  • Such a beginning, such an end.
  • Such as the man is, such will be his discourse.
  • Sudden glory soon goes out.
  • Sudden trust brings sudden repentance.
  • Sue a beggar and catch a louse.
  • Sue a beggar and get a louse.
  • Suit yourself to the times.
  • Summer sown corn and women's advice turn out once in every seven years.
  • Sweat makes good mortar.
  • Sweet song has betrayed many.
  • Sweet wine makes sour vinegar.
  • Take a horse to the knacker, and throw in bridle and saddle.
  • Take all you want; eat all you take.
  • Take care of your plough, and your plough will take care of you.
  • Take the world as it is, not as it ought to be.
  • Talk of the devil, and his imp appears.
  • Talking is easier than doing, and promising than performing.
  • Talking is silver, silence is gold.
  • Tell a lie, and you'll hear the truth.
  • Tell no tales out of school.
  • Tell not all you know; believe not all you hear; do not all you are able.
  • That is not in the looking-glass which is seen in the looking-glass.
  • That miller is honest who has hair on his teeth.
  • That usury is a sin some hold, but take for granted they've no gold.
  • The Russian knows the way, yet he asks for directions.
  • The anvil is not afraid of the hammer.
  • The anvil is used to noise.
  • The ass and his driver do not think alike.
  • The ass carries corn to the mill, and gets thistles.
  • The bailiff's cow and another's cow are two different cows.
  • The beggar's bag is bottomless.
  • The beginning hot, the middle lukewarm, the end cold.
  • The belly is a bad adviser.
  • The best answer to anger is silence.
  • The best friends are in one's purse.
  • The best go first, the bad remain to mend.
  • The best is what one has in his hand.
  • The best of the mill is that the sacks can't speak.
  • The bites of priests and wolves are hard to heal.
  • The cats that drive away mice are as food as those that catch them.
  • The chamois climbs high and yet is caught.
  • The cock is a lord on his own dunghill.
  • The cock is king on his own dunghill.
  • The cock shuts his eyes when he crows, because he knows it by heart.
  • The concealer is as bad as the thief.
  • The cow gives milk through her mouth.
  • The cow licks no strange calf.
  • The cows that low most give the least milk.
  • The debts go to the next heir.
  • The devil catches most souls in a golden net.
  • The devil dances in an empty pocket.
  • The devil finds work for idle hands to do.
  • The devil is civil when he is flattered.
  • The devil is in the details.
  • The devil is never so black as he is painted.
  • The devil likes to souse what is already wet.
  • The devil looks after his own.
  • The dog does not get bread every time he wags his tail.
  • The dog rages at the stone, not at him that throws it.
  • The dog returns to its vomit.
  • The dog that starts the hare is as good as the one that catches it.
  • The dogs bite the last.
  • The drunken mouth reveals the heart's secrets.
  • The egg will be more knowing than the hen.
  • The empty waggon must make room for the full one.
  • The end of wrath is the beginning of repentance.
  • The executioner is a keen shaver.
  • The eye is bigger than the belly.
  • The eye is never satiated with seeing.
  • The eyes believe themselves; the ears believe other people.
  • The fairer the hostess, the heavier the reckoning.
  • The farthest way about is the nearest way home.
  • The fast faggot is not easily broken.
  • The fat is in the fire.
  • The fatter the flea, the leaner the dog.
  • The fault of another is a good teacher.
  • The fewer the words, the better the prayer.
  • The fish lead a pleasant life, they drink when they like.
  • The fox changes his skin, but keeps the rogue.
  • The fox does not prey near his hole.
  • The fuller the cask, the duller its sound.
  • The fun is in the search, not the finding.
  • The furthest way about is the nearest way home.
  • The greatest conqueror is he who conquers himself.
  • The greatest step is out of doors.
  • The greatest things are done by the help of small ones.
  • The greatest wealth is contentment with a little.
  • The handsomest snuffs the candle.
  • The hasty man was never a traitor.
  • The hen likes to lay in a nest where there are eggs already.
  • The higher a monkey climbs, the more he shows his behind.
  • The higher flood hath always the lower ebb.
  • The higher the bell is hung, the shriller it sounds.
  • The higher the monkey climbs the more he shows his tail.
  • The higher the monkey goes the more he shows his tail.
  • The horse is not judged of by the saddle.
  • The horse that draws best is the most whipped.
  • The husband's mother is the wife's devil.
  • The key that is used grows bright.
  • The king cannot rule as he wishes.
  • The king's chaff is better than other folk's corn.
  • The last shuts the door.
  • The last stole the sack.
  • The late comer is ill lodged.
  • The later the evening, the fairer the company.
  • The laugh is always on the loser.
  • The man in the moon stole the wood.
  • The master's eye does more than both his hands.
  • The middle path is the safe path.
  • The miller's hen and widower's maid, of want need never be afraid.
  • The mills of God grind slowly, yet they grind exceeding small.
  • The more law, the less justice.
  • The more laws the less justice.
  • The more light a torch gives the shorter it lasts.
  • The more noble, the more humble.
  • The more the well is used, the more water it yields.
  • The more you stir the mire, the more it stinks.
  • The most disorderly students make the most pious preachers.
  • The narrower the cage, the sweeter the liberty.
  • The nearer the inn, the longer the road.
  • The nearest the dearest.
  • The office teaches the man.
  • The old forget, the young don't know.
  • The older a fool, the worse he is.
  • The older, the colder; the more avaricious, the more vicious.
  • The oldest trees often bear the sweetest fruit.
  • The one-eyed is a king among the blind.
  • The only real equality is in the cemetery.
  • The people's voice is God's voice.
  • The pitcher goes so often to the well, that it gets broken at last.
  • The poor must dance as the rich pipe.
  • The pope eats peasants, gulps gentlemen, and voids monks.
  • The priest loves his flock, but the lambs more than the wethers.
  • The repeated stroke will fell the oak.
  • The road to ruin is paved with good intentions.
  • The sick man is vexed with the flies on the wall.
  • The silent dog is the first to bite.
  • The stomach is easier filled than the eye.
  • The strong man's sport is the sickly man's death.
  • The sun will bring to light what lay under the snow.
  • The sun will shine into our yard too.
  • The sun-dial counts only the bright hours.
  • The sweetest grapes hang highest.
  • The sweetest wine makes the sharpest vinegar.
  • The thief cannot find any tree that suits him for a gallows.
  • The treason is loved, the traitor hated.
  • The tree must be bent while it is young.
  • The unbidden guest is ever a pest.
  • The unexpected always happens.
  • The unrighteous penny consumes the righteous dollar.
  • The unrighteous penny corrupts the righteous pound.
  • The weeping bride makes a laughing wife.
  • The will gives the work its name.
  • The will is the soul of the work.
  • The wind does not always blow from the same quarter.
  • The wind keeps not always in one quarter.
  • The wise drunkard is a sober fool.
  • The wise man has long ears and a short tongue.
  • The wood has ears, the field has eyes.
  • The work praises the workman.
  • The world likes to have night-owls, that it may have matter for wonder.
  • The worse the dun, the worst the paymaster.
  • There are many preachers who don't hear themselves.
  • There are more hands than heads.
  • There are more old tipplers than old doctors.
  • There are more threatened than struck.
  • There are more ways of killing a cat than choking it with cream.
  • There are more ways of killing a dog than choking it with butter.
  • There are more ways of killing a dog than hanging it.
  • There are only two good women in the world; the one is dead, the other not to be found.
  • There come just as many calf-skins as cow-skins to market.
  • There is always a Pharaoh who does not know Joseph.
  • There is always room at the top.
  • There is an exception to every rule.
  • There is more disputing about the shell than the kernel.
  • There is no eel so small but it hopes to become a whale.
  • There is no fool like an old fool.
  • There is no good in preaching to the hungry.
  • There is no law but has a hole in it, for those who can find it out.
  • There is no little enemy.
  • There is no occasion for priests to marry, while peasants have wives.
  • There is no off switch on a tiger.
  • There is no one luckier than he who thinks himself so.
  • There is no saint so petty but claims his own candle.
  • There is no stripping a naked man.
  • There is nothing so bad but may be of some use.
  • There the hedge is lowest, men leap over.
  • There's cunning in a pointed chin.
  • There's no making apples of plums.
  • There's no putting off a lie upon the belly.
  • There's no rest for the wicked.
  • There's nothing new under the sun.
  • There's nowt so queer as folk.
  • There's one born every minute.
  • There's seldom a cake but there's more of the make.
  • They are not all cooks who carry long knives.
  • They are not all friends who laugh with you.
  • They are not all hunters who blow horns.
  • They love the old that do not know the new.
  • They must be strong legs that can support prosperous days.
  • They must hunger in frost who spring-time have lost.
  • They must hunger in frost who will not work in heat.
  • They need much whom nothing will content.
  • They play till they quarrel.
  • They who come from afar are prone to lie.
  • They who deserve honour, fail of it; and they who obtain it, do not deserve it.
  • They who eat cherries with the great, are like to have the stones and stalks flung in their face.
  • They wrangle about an egg, and let the hens fly away.
  • Thirteen nuns, fourteen children!
  • Those bosoms can be sold cheapest which are stolen ready made.
  • Those who don't pick roses in summer won't pick them in winter either.
  • Those who tickle themselves may laugh when they please.
  • Those who wade in unknown waters will be sure to be drowned.
  • Though you seat the frog on a golden stool, he'll soon jump off again into the pool.
  • Thought when sober, said when drunk.
  • Thoughts are toll-free, but not hell-free.
  • Thousands drink themselves to death before one dies of thirst.
  • Three women, three geese, and three frogs, make a fair.
  • Three, helping one another, bear the burden of six.
  • Thrift is a great revenue.
  • Time and hour run through the roughest day.
  • Time and opportunity are in no man's sleeve.
  • Time and tide wait for no man.
  • Time betrays and hangs the thief.
  • Time brings everything, to those who can wait for it.
  • Time covers and discovers everything.
  • Time is anger's medicine.
  • Time is the best counsellor.
  • Time is the best preacher.
  • Time is the herald of truth.
  • Time makes hay.
  • Time, wine, women, and fortune, are ever changing.
  • Times change and we with time.
  • Timid dogs bark most.
  • Tired oxen must tread hard.
  • Tit for tat.
  • To a quick ear half a word.
  • To change and change for the better are two different things.
  • To change and to do better are two different things.
  • To every one his own is not too much.
  • To give quickly is to give doubly.
  • To good eating belongs good drinking.
  • To know is easier than to do.
  • To live long, eat like a cat, drink like a dog.
  • To remain young while growing old is the highest blessing.
  • To spend much and gain little is the sure road to ruin.
  • To the looker-on no work is too hard.
  • To-day in finery, to-morrow in filth.
  • To-day must borrow nothing of to-morrows.
  • Too many sacks are the death of the ass.
  • Too much bed makes a dull head.
  • Too much bursts the bag.
  • Too much humility is pride.
  • Too much is not enough.
  • Too much luck is bad luck.
  • Too much will soon break.
  • Too much wisdom is folly.
  • Trick against trick.
  • Trueman's house stands the longest.
  • Trust no one till you have eaten a bushel of salt with him.
  • Trust well rides away with the horse.
  • Trust, beware whom!
  • Trust, but not too much.
  • Trusting too much to others has been the ruin of many.
  • Truth creeps not into corners.
  • Truth finds no asylum.
  • Truth gives a short answer, lies go round about.
  • Truth ill-timed is as bad as a lie.
  • Truth makes the tongue smart.
  • Truth should not always be revealed.
  • Truth will out.
  • Truth's best ornament is nakedness.
  • Two cats and one mouse, two women in one house, two dogs to one bone, will not agree long.
  • Two dogs over one bone seldom agree.
  • Two eyes, two ears, only one mouth.
  • Two hard flints never grind well.
  • Two in distress makes sorrow the less.
  • Two is company, but three is none.
  • Two is company, but three's a crowd.
  • Unlaid eggs are a long time becoming chickens.
  • Unlooked-for often comes.
  • Victory is not gained by idleness.
  • Virtue flourishes in misfortune.
  • Virtue never dies.
  • Virtue subdues power.
  • Virtue would not go far, if a little vanity walked not with it.
  • Wait, is a hard word to the hungry.
  • War is pleasant to those who have not tried it.
  • Watching women is labour in vain.
  • Water is the strongest drink; it drives mills.
  • We beat the sack and mean the miller.
  • We cannot all be Pope of Rome.
  • We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails.
  • We do in haste what we repent at leisure.
  • We give to the rich, and take from the poor.
  • We hang little thieves, and take off our hats to great ones.
  • We knock in jest, and it is opened in earnest.
  • We know what we have, but not what we shall get.
  • We must eat and drink though every tree were a gallows.
  • Weeds never die.
  • Weeds want no sowing.
  • Well-done outlives death.
  • Were I a hatter, men would come into the world without heads.
  • Were a woman rules the house, the devil is serving-man.
  • Were he to throw a groat on the roof, it would come down a dollar.
  • What God haith joined together, let no man put asunder.
  • What Manchester says today, the rest of England says tomorrow.
  • What Master Jacky does not learn, Mr. John never knows.
  • What belongs to the ravens is never drowned.
  • What bird so white as mine? says the crow.
  • What blossoms beautifully, withers fast.
  • What comes from the heart, goes to the heart.
  • What comes seldom, comes sharp.
  • What does the moon care if the dogs bay at her?
  • What goes around, comes around.
  • What goes down usually comes up.
  • What goes up must come down.
  • What greater crime than loss of time?
  • What harm is there in a good word? It costs nothing.
  • What is no sin, is no shame.
  • What is not taken by the Church is taken by the Exchequer.
  • What is right for the one is reasonable for the other.
  • What is said is said, and no sponge can wipe it out.
  • What is sport to the cat is death to the mouse.
  • What is the use of running when we are not on the right road?
  • What is too high, that let fly.
  • What man has made, man can destroy.
  • What one does not bake, another brews.
  • What one is accustomed to in youth, one does in old age.
  • What one knows it is useful sometimes to forget.
  • What ripens fast does not last.
  • What should a cow do with a nutmeg?
  • What signifies the barking of a dog that don't bite?
  • What smarts teaches.
  • What soberness conceals, drunkenness reveals.
  • What the eyes see, the heart believes.
  • What the lion cannot, the fox can.
  • What the peacock has too little on his head, he has too much on his tail.
  • What three know will soon be known to thirty.
  • What we want in hay we make up in straw.
  • What you do, do quickly.
  • What you give, is written in sand; what you take, with an iron hand.
  • What you have, hold.
  • What you lend to a friend, an enemy sues for.
  • What you lose on the swings you gain on the roundabouts.
  • What! keep a dog and bark myself?
  • What's of no use is too dear at a gift.
  • What's one man's meat's another man's poison.
  • What's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander.
  • What's sport to you is death to us. [Fable of Boys and Frogs.]
  • What's the good of a sun-dial in the shade?
  • What's the use of putting honey in an ass's mouth.
  • Whatever is given to the poor, is laid out of the reach of fortune.
  • Whatever is to be a hook, bends early.
  • Whatever is to be a nettle, burns early.
  • When Christ was along, the devil tempted him.
  • When David grew old he sang pious psalms.
  • When God says To-day, the devil says To-morrow.
  • When a dove begins to associate with crows its feathers remain white but its heart grows black.
  • When a man is down, everybody runs over him.
  • When a man is rich, he begins to save.
  • When a thing is done, make the best of it.
  • When blind leads the blind, both fall into the ditch.
  • When fortune knocks, open the door.
  • When it blows, the trees shake.
  • When misfortune comes in at the door, love flies out of the window.
  • When need is greatest, help is nearest.
  • When old horses get warm, they are not easily held in.
  • When one goose drinks, all drink.
  • When poverty comes in at the door, love flies out at the window.
  • When poverty comes in at the door, love jumps out at the window.
  • When shepherds quarrel, the wolf has a winning game.
  • When silent men speak they speak to the purpose.
  • When sorrow is asleep wake it not.
  • When the calf is stolen, the peasant mends the stall.
  • When the dog is awake, the shepherd may sleep.
  • When the fox preaches, look to the geese.
  • When the fox wants to catch geese, he wags his tail.
  • When the guest is in most favour, he will do well to quit.
  • When the hen had laid an egg she cackles.
  • When the horse dies, dismount.
  • When the jest is at its best, 'twill be well to let it rest.
  • When the lords come out of the council-house, they are wiser than when they went in.
  • When the measure is full, it runs over.
  • When the root is worthless, so is the tree.
  • When the tale of bricks is doubled, then comes Moses.
  • When the wine runs to waste in the cellar, he mends the cask.
  • When the word is out, it belongs to another.
  • When you sweep the stairs, you start at the top.
  • Where God bestows an office, he provides brains to fill it.
  • Where God builds a church, the devil builds a chapel.
  • Where all adulterers to wear grey coats, the cloth would be dear.
  • Where every one goes, the grass never grows.
  • Where ghosts walk, there is loving or thieving.
  • Where gold avails, argument fails.
  • Where gold chinks, arguments are of no avail.
  • Where honour ceaseth, there knowledge decreaseth.
  • Where honour grows a span, folly grows an ell.
  • Where might is master, justice is servant.
  • Where might is right, right is not might.
  • Where money, there friends.
  • Where the best wine grows, the worst is drunk.
  • Where the devil can't go himself, he sends an old woman.
  • Where the hedge is lowest, the devil leaps over.
  • Where the lion's skin falls short, borrow of the fox.
  • Where there are no swamps there are no frogs.
  • Where there are too many workmen, there is little work.
  • Where there is shame, there is virtue.
  • Where there is smoke there is fire.
  • Where there no fools, there would be no wise men.
  • Where there's money, there is the devil; but where there's none, a greater evil.
  • Where there's muck there's brass.
  • Where there's no jealousy, there's no love.
  • Where there's no love, all faults are seen.
  • Where there's no love, there's no honour.
  • Where two fall out, the third wins.
  • Where water has been, water will come again.
  • Where wine goes in, modesty goes out.
  • Where'er an ass is crown'd to fame, both town and country bear the shame.
  • Wherever there is a pretty spot, the devil plants a monastery or a lord.
  • Wherever there is mischief, there is sure to be a priest and a woman in it.
  • While the pot boils, friendship blooms.
  • Who accepts from another sells his freedom.
  • Who accepts nothing has nothing to return.
  • Who are ready to believe, are easy to deceive.
  • Who avoids small sins, does not fall into great ones.
  • Who begins amiss ends amiss.
  • Who begins too much, accomplishes little.
  • Who blackens others, does not whiten himself.
  • Who bows to might loses his right.
  • Who cannot fight, wins nought by right.
  • Who cannot sing, may whistle.
  • Who carries doubtful people to his house, will doubtless from his carriage something lose.
  • Who comes unbidden departs unthanked.
  • Who deceives me once, shame on him; if he deceive me twice, shame on me.
  • Who demands justice, must administer justice.
  • Who does not punish evil, invites it.
  • Who falls short in the head, must be long in the heels.
  • Who has a head won't want for a hat.
  • Who has a mouth, let him not say to another, "Blow!"
  • Who has tasted a sour apple, will have the more relish for a sweet one.
  • Who has, let him thereof take heed; love wanes, misfortune comes with speed.
  • Who heeds not little things, will be troubled about lesser ones.
  • Who herds with wolves, must howl with wolves.
  • Who honours not age, is unworthy of it.
  • Who hunts two hares together catches neither.
  • Who is ell seated should not budge.
  • Who is not ashamed of his sins, sins double.
  • Who is over nice, loses many a slice.
  • Who lends his lips to nought but blame, has in his heart no love of fame.
  • Who lets another sit on his shoulder, will soon have him on his head.
  • Who loves his work and knows to spare, may live and flourish anywhere.
  • Who loves not women, wine, and song, remains a fool his whole life long.
  • Who makes friends of all, keeps none.
  • Who makes no promises, has none to perform.
  • Who neither believes heaven or hell, the devil heartily wishes him well.
  • Who readily borrows, readily lies.
  • Who receives, should thank; who gives, should be silent.
  • Who refuses to submit to justice, must not complain of oppression.
  • Who rides slow, must saddle betimes.
  • Who says little has little to answer for.
  • Who seeks adventures finds blows.
  • Who so deaf as he that will not hear.
  • Who speaks ill of others to you will speak ill of you to others.
  • Who steals a calf, steals a cow.
  • Who takes an eel by the tail or a woman by her word, grasp as he will, holds nothing fast.
  • Who takes the child by the hand takes the mother by the heart.
  • Who the daughter would win, with mamma must begin.
  • Who threatens, warns.
  • Who throws a stone above him may have it fall on his own head.
  • Who will not feed the cats, must feed the mice and rats.
  • Who would be rich, must keep his soul under cover of his cash-box.
  • Who would be young in age, must in youth be sage.
  • Who would win, must learn to bear.
  • Who would wish to be valued must make himself scarce.
  • Who's the man that was never fooled by a woman.
  • Whoever cares to learn will always find a teacher.
  • Whoever invented work must not have had anything to do.
  • Whom fortune favours, the world favours.
  • Whore or thief young or old, welcome so you've got the gold.
  • Whose bread I eat: his song I sing.
  • Windmills are not driven by bellows.
  • Wine and women make fools of everybody.
  • Wine upon beer is very good cheer; beer upon wine consider with fear.
  • With all my heart! says the boor, when he must.
  • With great men one must allow five to be an even number.
  • With great pleasure, says the boor, when he must.
  • With houses and gold, men are rarely bold.
  • With nice appearance people want to be deceived.
  • With one foot in the grave.
  • With patience and time the mulberry leaf becomes a silk gown.
  • With someone holding nothing but trumps it is impossible to play cards.
  • Without knowledge, without sin.
  • Woman's beauty, the forest echo, and rainbows, soon pass away.
  • Women and maidens must be praised, whether truly or falsely.
  • Women and wine, game and deceit, Make the wealth small and the wants great.
  • Women are as fickle as April weather.
  • Women are as wavering as the wind.
  • Women are necessary evils.
  • Women are never at a loss for words.
  • Women are watches that keep bad time.
  • Women, fortune, and gold, favour fools.
  • Woo the widow whilst she is in weeds.
  • Woods have ears, fields have eyes.
  • Words are good, but fowls lay eggs.
  • Words are good, when works follow.
  • Words don't will the sack.
  • Words of snow, which fell last year.
  • Words often do more than blows.
  • Work makes free.
  • Workmen are easier found than masters.
  • Would you be strong, conquer yourself.
  • Would you live long, be healthy and fat, drink like a dog and eat like a cat.
  • Write on one of the devil's horns, "Good angel," and many will believe it.
  • Yielding stays war.
  • Yorkshire born and Yorkshire bred, strong in the arm and weak in the head.
  • You can do anything with children if you only play with them.
  • You cannot make a sieve of an ass's tail.
  • You cannot make a silk purse of a sow's ear.
  • You have to take life as it happens, but you should try to make it happen the way you want to take it.
  • Young angel, old devil.
  • Young gamblers, old beggars.
  • Young men may die, but old men must die.
  • Young saint, old devil.
  • Young soldiers, old beggars.
  • Your words are fair, said the wolf, "but I will not come into the village."
  • Youth and white paper take any impression.

Home
One Liners
Tweet Messages
Proverbs Quotes Free SMS
Privacy Policy
Contact Us
Sitemap